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I'm replacing an old Electrolux induction cooker with a new one (Electrolux Serie 300 CIR60433). The old one was connected to the power from the wall (continental Europe 3-phase colours) earth to earth, blue to blue, black to black, brown to brown, and there was a grey from the wall to the junction box but not to the cooker. From what I've read, this is 2-phase and is fairly common for cookers in continental Europe.

The new cooker has different wiring. Earth, two blue wires that are joined together, and a black and brown joined together. Here is a picture of the wiring as supplied on the new cooker:

enter image description here

and a diagram for single or 2-phase use:

enter image description here
Source: Pages 7/8 of the manual in Czech

Here is the translation of 3.3 on page 7:

  • Two-phase connection
  1. Remove the cable end from black and brown wire.
  2. Remove the insulation from the brown and black conductor.
  3. Use a new cable end 1.5 mm² to the end of each wire. (A special tool is required.)  Cable cross-section

Am I correct in thinking that because I'm making a 2-phase connection again, I should separate the brown and black wires as described above? Then I just make the same connections as on the old cooker but the only difference being that two neutral wires from the cooker are connected together (as shown in the photo).

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  • For those of us who don't speak Czech as well... (OK, at all ;) would you please translate the colors in the table at the top of page 8. Many of the electricians will be able to sort it out from the N, L and L1/L2 designations, but just to be on the extra safe side...
    – FreeMan
    Dec 16, 2022 at 12:21
  • Thanks for making my post more readable.
    – BennyJJ
    Dec 16, 2022 at 13:50
  • I didn't edit my comment fast enough! The colours are (Single Phase connection 230 V) Earth: Green/yellow, N: Blue and grey, L: Black and brown (Two phase connection 400 V 2~N) Earth: Green/yellow, N: Blue and grey, L1: Black, L2: Brown Those two blue wires in the photo are not the same blue and perhaps they consider one of them grey.
    – BennyJJ
    Dec 16, 2022 at 13:57
  • You're welcome, and YOU are always welcome to edit your question (or answer) as well. As a matter of fact, please do so to put the colors from your comment into the question itself. Not everyone will see the translations down here in the comments, and comments can get deleted.
    – FreeMan
    Dec 16, 2022 at 14:13

1 Answer 1

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Am I correct in thinking that because I'm making a 2-phase connection again, I should separate the brown and black wires as described above? Then I just make the same connections as on the old cooker but the only difference being that two neutral wires from the cooker are connected together (as shown in the photo).

Basically yes.

These cookers are almost always built with two independent modules, each handling two elements. Usually the two elements on the left run on one module, and the two on the right on another module. So your cable has live and neutral for each module, for a total of 4 wires, 2 live and 2 neutral.

If you have three phase, then the two blue wires go to neutral, and the brown/black each go to separate phases to share power among phases.

Note if you don't have a three phase RCD, but three single phase RCDs instead, then it gets more complicated because they will strongly dislike having their neutrals tied together. Since your in-wall cable has only one neutral from your description, that should not be the case.

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  • Thank you! I've just noticed once I translated the table that they describe the two neutral wires as blue and grey (modry a sedy) although as you can see in the photo, they both look a shade of blue. That shouldn't change anything right? They're both still described as neutral and as you say, there's a live and a neutral for each module.
    – BennyJJ
    Dec 16, 2022 at 14:01
  • That sounds correct
    – bobflux
    Dec 16, 2022 at 14:11

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