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I am adding a 20a breaker for a new saw in the garage. There is an existing 1" steel pipe through the poured concrete floor of my patio that links the basement and the garage. There is an existing run of BX cable that I plan on removing and replacing with 14/2. So I will be cutting the BX out, adding an enclosure on both ends of the pipe and running a single 14/2 (to replace the existing BX) and a 12/2 through. It's a straight shot, less than 15 feet. and accessible from both ends. Any red flags I should be aware of? Or should I run single conductors like 3x12awg and 3x14awg?

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  • There is steel pipe and electrical listed steel pipe. The two cannot be consider to be the same(as in code/inspection).
    – crip659
    Nov 25, 2022 at 23:26
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    You only need one 12 AWG ground wire for both circuits, using THWN (THWN-2, etc) wires. The wires need to be wet rated, virtually all are. Cables would need to be wet rated, the usual ones are not, and cables quickly become problematic for conduit fill, so do't go there. Use 5 wires (or 4 big wires and put a sub-panel in the garage...)
    – Ecnerwal
    Nov 26, 2022 at 0:13
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    Note that it's not abandoned if it has a BX cable running though it now - though the BX cable is improper, not being wet-rated AFAIK.
    – Ecnerwal
    Nov 26, 2022 at 0:29
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    Psst. When you sell your house, stick a sign "20A EV Charging Outlet" on the 20A socket. You will get higher offers. 20A isn't the huge Thunder-Charger most people think they want, but it replaces 100-160 miles a night, and that's all they need. Nov 26, 2022 at 6:53

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Run the individual conductors instead of the cable. The cable would have to be rated for wet location and would be very hard to pull because of the insulation and being solid wire. You can get the #12 AWG and the #14 AWG in stranded so it will be easier to pull. The #14 has to be on a 15 amp breaker. If the boxes are located outdoors, they need to be weatherproof.

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    15 foot straight shot I really wouldn't worry about stranded wires, nor pay the extra price for stranded .vs. solid.
    – Ecnerwal
    Nov 26, 2022 at 0:08
  • @Ecnerwal Good point. I'm just used to longer pulls and many conductors so always thinking stranded. Hope you had a good turkey day.
    – JACK
    Nov 26, 2022 at 0:29
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Depends what kind of pipe it is, and if it's entirely indoors.

If it is bona-fide electrical conduit, then you can put junction boxes at each end and use individual wires in the pipe. Much easier pulling.

Otherwise it's just regular pipe and it doesn't count. You'll need to use a cable type which is legal not in a pipe in that location. Anytime you see metal-clad cable in use, always ask yourself "why". Don't assume the last guy was a fool. E.g. it may be a local requirement.

This sounds outdoors/underground, so NM-B/Romex cable is not allowed. Inside a pipe outdoors or underground is still outdoors or underground.

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    to be clear, "legal not in a pipe" means "legal without requiring a pipe/conduit", and the pipe would be added for convenience or a form of required protection (e.g. burial depth). It doesn't mean it's not allowed to be in a pipe.
    – P2000
    Nov 26, 2022 at 6:48

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