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So we just changed our almost 20 year old 20l red lion pressure tank since leaking, we put in 21l red lion again, kept same set up connecting to it we just used new pipes, checked air pressure on new tank set to manufacturer requirements and check cut off on pump stayed the same also, but we have a noticeable difference in water pressure in all faucets and shower, can't figure out why,double check all connection ans setting Any ideas what could be going on Thanks

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  • My first suspicion would be that the new tank does not have enough air in it. A standard water pressure tank has a substantial "charge" of air that is used to maintain pressure as water is drawn out, and it's not unusual for the charge to be weak when a new tank is installed.
    – Hot Licks
    Nov 11, 2022 at 3:23

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You apparently also changed the pressure switch. That will have to be adjusted up to where it was before the tank change. Check to be sure the pressure on the new tank is correct for the new pressure.

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  • No didn't change the switch just checked it to make sure it was working properly, we checked pressure in tank it was à little low so we added a bit, up to manufacturers specs, everything was doubled check, that's why we don't get the loss in pressure
    – user158810
    Nov 11, 2022 at 2:24
  • No didn't change the switch just checked it to make sure it was working properly, we checked pressure in tank it was à little low so we added a bit, up to manufacturers specs, everything was doubled check, that's why we don't get the loss in pressure
    – user158810
    Nov 11, 2022 at 2:27
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Sounds like you may have clogged things up with debris in the pipes from changing the tank.

Various things (calcium, rust, etc.) deposit from the water to the inside of the pipes, gradually over time - what, exactly, depends on your water chemistry and what your pipes are made of.

Changing out the pressure tank would involve disturbing, draining, and refilling the pipes - which will cause a lot of the deposits to come loose, and end up in your aerator screens, valve orifices, and other places they clog things up and reduce flow.

Try removing the aerator screens (and showerhead) and opening each faucet fully for at least a few seconds - catch some water in a glass or bucket and stop flushing when there's no more debris visible in the water coming out. I've had at least two houses where the water (in copper piping) would run a mass of rust (dumped over time from the water itself) for as much as several minutes any time the piping was drained for work. You'll need to clean the screens and showerhead as well, typically by backflushing or rinsing them.

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