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Is a 12 x 16 bedroom. There's a section at the door that isn't level. A dip of about 3/16" over a 4' run just by the door. I plan on removing and replacing that 4'x4' section in order to make it level. The question is what to put beneath it where it dips to support it. Leveling compound? Tar paper?

There is plywood below the particleboard section that I'll remove. Would self-leveling compound be appropriate? I'm concerned that it'll be brittle and crack/shift over time.

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    Do you know why there's a dip. A little more info will help get you a good answer. Commented Oct 5, 2022 at 19:59
  • I may know more after I take up that section of particleboard. The basement is finished so I can't see from underneath. Commented Oct 6, 2022 at 2:44
  • "I plan on removing and replacing that 4'x4' section" of subfloor? You'll have a heck of a time getting self-leveling compound to balance on the floor joists while you install the plywood back on top. You'd put the SLC on top of the subfloor. Or, lift the subfloor and shim the top of the joists level, then reinstall the fubfloor.
    – FreeMan
    Commented Oct 6, 2022 at 11:28
  • There is plywood below the particleboard section that I'll remove. Would self-leveling compound be appropriate? Im concerned that it'll be brittle and crack/shift over time. Commented Oct 6, 2022 at 13:08

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I would use a self leveling cementitious product or build it up with a cork underlayment or both. I've done many rehabs using this method

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  • Cork seems like a padding or underlayment level that many engineered floors do not approve of installing. This may not be appropriate for all installations.
    – FreeMan
    Commented Oct 6, 2022 at 11:28
  • The "leveling" will be done between the base plywood and the added plywood (that replaces the non-flat particleboard. The engineered floor will be atop all that. Commented Oct 6, 2022 at 13:11
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Leveling products can be messy and troublesome, especially if your subfloor isn't level. They can also disintegrate over time due to movement. I generally don't use them except over concrete.

In my opinion the subfloor should be level, not just the underlayment. I would be opening that up and shimming or sistering the framing. If you can't cut tight to the wall, there is where you could use some compound to fill, using a straightedge off the raised subfloor.

Post photos for more detailed suggestions.

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