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I’ve added a short extension for a grill quick disconnect to my home’s natural gas plumbing, and I’m finding the straps to secure it to the outside wall are lacking. They're perfectly sized for the pipe, but don’t account for the larger-diameter fittings that offset the pipe from the wall a few mm.

Overhead view of pipe and strap showing gap

If I just screw that to the wall, it won’t look very nice. There are plastic straps from Oatey that have a bit of material to go between, but they still don’t sit perfectly flat. I could have offset it further away from the wall, but changing that now would require re-doing the whole thing, and I don’t want to do that.

This seems like a very common need, but I can’t find a good strap for the purpose.

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    I'm not sure that looking nice has ever been a concern when attaching pipes to the outside of walls. The real concern is whether it will hold the pipe properly.
    – user253751
    Sep 27 at 21:39

4 Answers 4

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Yes a two-hole strap like the one you've shown is a normal way of securing a pipe. When you tighten the mounting screw the strap will easily bend so that its ears are held down firmly against the surface.

A cushioned pipe clamp or conduit hanger might be alternatives with style more to your liking. (images: grainger.com)

cushioned pipe clamp conduit hanger

If it were me, though, I'd proceed with the two-hole strap and, if its appearance still bothers in a few weeks, then find a strip of plastic of the right thickness and place it on the wall as a spacer between that and the pipe and strap ears.

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  • Yeah, that's probably the best solution. I'm astonished, however, that suitable straps aren't more readily available. I like the one on the left image, for example.
    – Rick
    Sep 28 at 0:15
  • Wow, the Grainger part is $10.90/ea???
    – Rick
    Sep 28 at 0:17
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    Such is the price of fashion...
    – FreeMan
    Sep 28 at 11:28
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    There are plenty of pipe standoffs, such as the three-part threaded rod type (mounting base, threaded rod, two halves that go around the pipe) but you'd have to plan for them rather than put the pipe in and try to add them after the fact - unless you want to take the pipe out again, first.
    – Ecnerwal
    Sep 28 at 12:58
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Get a larger strap that will fit the coupling instead of the pipe.

enter image description here

Oatey makes Galvanized 2-Hole Pipe Hanger Straps available in 1.5", 2", 3", and 4" so pick the one which works best.

They also make rolls of galvanized strapping which you can cut to length.

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Buy a box of galvanized washers. Put enough washers between the building and the strap to make the fit right.

Go back over it with the same paint color used on the pipe.

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  • For this distance it may be better looking to use a hexnut as a spacer
    – Pelle
    Sep 28 at 12:49
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Cut a piece of wood, same width as the space between the two pipe ends, and wide (high) enough to allow the two screws to go through into the plugs in the wall. The wood needs to be as thick (from wall outwards) to make the pipes have a snug fit against the wall.

So, something like 3" x 3" x 1/2" is suggested. Paint the same as the pipe. Or, for longevity, procure a block of plastic for the same job.

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