1

We moved to a house with "older"/original spigots which we want to replace since they are leaky, old and not very useable (probably not up to code either) - assumption is that they are connected to galvanized steel pipes. We can't tell since basement is finished. The leak is where the water comes out from the spigot (where it "should be").

We got an insanely high quote from a plumbing company to go through the basement ceiling and replace the old pipes and then the spigots.

I was wondering if there is anything I could do myself which would be "easier" in order to at least stop the leak, not even replace the spigot itself since we don't "have to".

This is how the spigot looks like: https://i.sstatic.net/pOew7.jpg

enter image description here

7
  • 1
    You mean the water is just coming out of the actual 'hole water comes out of'? Why not just change the washers? $£€ 0.10 each.
    – Tetsujin
    Commented Aug 2, 2022 at 16:44
  • Yes it does come out of the "hole water comes out of". How would you go about changing the washers?
    – Idos
    Commented Aug 2, 2022 at 16:45
  • At a guess - water off at the main. Unscrew the nut on the central shaft, pull the entire centre out, take it to a plumbers' merchant & say in your best 'I don't know what I'm doing' voice… "I need a new washer for this." [The thing about washers is they really all do look the same. Only today I did just the same thing - it took them half an hour going through boxes of the buggers before they found the right one. ]
    – Tetsujin
    Commented Aug 2, 2022 at 16:47
  • What @Tetsujin said and support the valve base while unscrewing the nut counterclockwise so the whole valve doesn't turn.
    – JACK
    Commented Aug 2, 2022 at 16:51
  • Most of that insanely high quote was probably due to labour of removing and replacing ceiling plus the pipes. Most people can do pipe replacement themselves with a little easy to get knowledge. Ceiling work is also easy.
    – crip659
    Commented Aug 2, 2022 at 16:51

2 Answers 2

1

It's likely that you only need to replace the packing that shuts off the water.

You can access that by first turning off the water leading to the spigot and then turning the nut that it just behind the handle. That should make the entire mechanism come out. It looks like a frost-proof spigot so the packing will be deep inside.

1
  • To reiterate Jack's comment here - use a wrench to hold the faucet still while unscrewing the valve packing nut. Might as well pick up some valve stem packing material while getting the new sealing washer, too, in case it's needed.
    – Ecnerwal
    Commented Aug 2, 2022 at 17:33
1

We got an insanely high quote from a plumbing company to go through the basement ceiling and replace the old pipes and then the spigots.

I have no doubt it was high considering the work you described.

Ask for a quote to repair the existing spigot at an hourly rate; I imagine 2-3 hours at $150/hour.

assumption is that they are connected to galvanized steel pipes. We can't tell since basement is finished.

Probably true.

The problem with galvanized pipe is that it rusts from the inside out so you cannot see how structurally compromised the interior is. If you try to unscrew the spigot you could very well just snap off the threading.

The other problem is that 70-100 years is the life expectancy of galvanized water pipes. You can either pay now to have it done right throughout your basement or wait a few years to save up some money; hopefully before the pipes fail above your finished ceiling. Check your homeowner's insurance policy to see if such an event is covered.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.