0

I want to add an outlet near my toilet for a bidet. There is an existing 20 amp GFCI outlet near the door. It is on a separate circuit from the lights. It is connected to another GFCI in the master bedroom. There is also a PVC pipe (vent pipe) running up the wall behind the mirror from the sink.

Are there any problems with placing the new 20 amp outlet (non-GFCI) near the toilet and running 12 ga Romex up the wall, through several studs, around the PVC pipe, and tapping off the existing outlet (using the load terminals)? Are there any major pitfalls/code violations with this approach? Any advice would be much appreciated!

New outlet wiring plan

12
  • 3
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but from what I've been reading, I should use a non-GFCI outlet for the new outlet because it will be connected to a GFCI. Using two GFCIs connected together can cause issues?
    – ab217
    Jul 19 at 17:58
  • 1
    If easier can route by going under the floor or in the wall behind the cabinet/vanity also, but everything else looks good.
    – crip659
    Jul 19 at 18:05
  • 1
    @Aloysius Defenestrate No, it is on the second story and there is no real attic access above it either.
    – ab217
    Jul 19 at 20:49
  • 1
    The problem is, most fools attach wires to the Load terminals of the GFCI without knowing what that is or how it works. So they end up accidentally daisy chaining GFCIs, and it's ...annoying. If you connect all wires to "Line" then multiple GFCIs on a circuit are fine. If you don't know all about Load and downline protection, you should only use Line... Problem solved! Jul 19 at 23:42
  • 2
    @Harper-ReinstateMonica My reading is that the existing outlet is already GFCI, so daisy chaining a new ordinary 3-prong outlet to the load terminals of the existing outlet would leave both GFCI protected. By "downstream one will not be GFCI" I only meant it would not have GFCI circuitry built in, but would have GFCI protection courtesy of the upstream outlet. Also, I have heard that Elvis is not dead :)
    – Armand
    Jul 20 at 18:09

3 Answers 3

5

Likely far easier to go down the wall and into the cabinet, across the back of the cabinet and either into the wall to a receptacle, or you could even install a receptacle into the side of the cabinet.

As far as GFCI, you have two options:

  • Connect a new ordinary receptacle to the LOAD side of the GFCI/receptacle. Done right, this is cheapest and highly recommended.
  • Pigtail off the LINE side of the GFCI/receptacle and install another GFCI/receptacle.

The rationale for a second GFCI/receptacle is easy reset. But that really only makes sense (if at all - I have receptacles in two bathrooms on the same circuit with the GFCI in one and the other connected via LOAD, and it is not a problem at all since GFCI trips are extremely rare) if the receptacles are in different rooms. With the receptacles just a few feet apart, using LOAD to connect the second one makes a lot of sense, and saves money too.

5
  • 1
    If I went down the wall from the existing outlet and through the cabinet, would I just attach the romex to the back of the cabinet? Would I place it inside something like EMT conduit to protect incase the sink leaks? The initial reason I was planning on going above the vanity cabinet is because I might be replacing the vanity in the near future too.
    – ab217
    Jul 19 at 18:12
  • The vanity is also attached to the wall so I would have to separate it from the wall first.
    – ab217
    Jul 19 at 18:21
  • 1
    You would not necessarily have to separate it from the wall. If it was me, I would cut a big hole (reciprocating saw would work well) in the left side below the countertop & drawers. Make sure you're in the same stud bay as the GFCI/receptacle. Pull out the GFCI/receptacle. Feed Romex from there down into the cabinet and pull through enough to go across the back of the cabinet and to the right-side wall. Cover it up on the back wall with wood or PVC or whatever - you are not trying to protect from water (short of a major flood it wouldn't be an issue anyway), just protect from accidental Jul 19 at 18:30
  • 1
    damage. Cut a hole in the right side wall and mount a box and receptacle. Someday when you decide to replace the vanity you can either reroute through the wall (since it will be easily accessible, and if blocked by the new vanity you won't have to patch/paint perfectly, just cover the holes) or do a similar setup with the new vanity. Jul 19 at 18:32
  • 2
    Update: I followed the advice that @manassehkatz-Moving 2 Codidact gave and it worked great! Ended up using a non-GFCI outlet attached to the load terminals of the existing GFCI and it appears all is working well!
    – ab217
    Jul 20 at 2:57
2

Yes there is a problem with non GFCI protected circuits.yes I understand you say load of a GFCI but the term non-GFCI needs addressed.

Can you have a receptacle that the GFCI devise is in a location other than the bathroom? YES code only states that the receptacles in the bathroom be GFCI protected.

As professional advice don’t use the load side of a GFCI receptacle in a different room use the line side! And install a Tamper resistance GFCI next to the stool. Note I also use weather resistant GFCI’s in bathrooms.

Someone mentioned a dedicated circuit for bathrooms would this be legal if receptacles are also in another room? Yes there must be 1 20 amp that is dedicated to bathrooms it can power everything. It sounds like you have a dedicated ckt, a lighting ckt and now a 3rd ckt code only provides the minimum exceed that and you are fine with more receptacle circuits

1
  • 1
    Re: "I also use weather resistant GFCI’s in bathrooms." Yes! Likely to be plenty of hot humid air in a bathroom.
    – Armand
    Jul 20 at 18:05
1

As of any recent NEC, the bidet outlet needs GFCI protection.

As of NEC 2020, the bidet outlet does not need to be on the bathroom receptacle circuit, because some rules for bathroom receptacles were changed to only apply to countertop outlets. It might not even be allowed on the bathroom recep circuit, come to think of it. So you do not need to feed it from the bathroom recep circuit, and you can feed it off bedroom, lights, or other circuit on the other side of the wall. Whichever is more convenient.

It needs GFCI protection. If you want to do that with a GFCI receptacle there, that's fine.

The rule with GFCI receptacles is, if you never use the Load terminals, you can have as many GFCI receptacles on a circuit as you want. However, if you do use the Load terminals, it's complicated... boy howdy...

Read the GFCI instructions for how to attach 2 wires to 1 screw.

1
  • bathroom circuits have mandated 1 circuit as a minimum for decades but you could ALWAYS have more than one. This is the same with the mandated kitchen small appliance circuits and laundry, there is a minimum but never a maximum.
    – Ed Beal
    Jul 20 at 19:13

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.