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I looked up converters that run off 12 volt battery in cars and 24 volt using 2 batteries wired correctly cuz I see they make 24 volt converters. I am sure for past 30 years these are all made in China and they are &^$@ so I don't want to do that way. I looked up generator heads cuz I can mount that to the motor turn it with a belt. But I do not know if there is such a thing that can regulate or maintain the volts for 220 even if I use an old school manual throttle cable to keep the rpms up. I will need some kind of gauge and mount it inside the truck on the dash to show me the volts the generator head is putting out. Not sure where to buy this gauge even if they make them anymore. I also looked up 120 volt stick welder that weld DC at least 140 amps. I know a little about older cars and trucks back in the good old days up to early 1960s cars/ trucks had manually adjustable voltage regulators and if you got this wrong you melted lots of wires. They still make these old voltage regulators. I thought how can I use one of these these auto voltage regulators my not be able to handle the amp draw so the auto voltage reg- may melt. I was looking for a thing that is like a generator head but it puts out DC current and it makes different amps depending on the rpms the motor turns cuz that would be the way for me to go but not sure if they such a thing. IF anyone has any ideas please let me know.

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  • two 12 Volt in parallel wont make 24, but will provide more current. Two 12 volt in series could provide 24, but it could also destroy the batteries.
    – Ruskes
    Jun 27 at 1:42
  • 2
    Consider a gasoline powered welder
    – Jasen
    Jun 27 at 4:52
  • @knowitall, stick welders don't output 120V more like 20 to 30V a 140A welder needs 3 or 4 kilowatts.
    – Jasen
    Jun 27 at 4:55
  • In a pinch you can stick-weld using a 24V battery, but you're much better off with a current-limited supply like you get from a generator.
    – Jasen
    Jun 27 at 4:57

3 Answers 3

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That's not gonna happen.

What you want to do is run your welder off the starting battery of a gas/diesel car.

That's impossible, that battery cannot produce enough power to do that.

Electric could do it easily

You can do it just fine using the battery on an F150 Lightning or a Rivian and the 120/240VAC power they provide onboard. Just plug in any quality electric welder.

Or for that matter, you could just keep the gas or diesel truck, and fit sections of an EV battery pack, maybe 10 KWH or so, into an armored pickup truck tool box. Add a BMS, DC and AC charger, and appropriately sized inverter. Now you have all the 120/240V you need to run any common electric welder or compressor. Say you put 2 grand of battery in there, that's 10 KWH, you're welding for 3-4 hours of actual spizzz-i-spitz before that battery flattens. Nobody can weld continuously, so that'll last you all day and then some.

I looked up generator heads cuz I can mount that to the motor turn it with a belt. But I do not know if there is such a thing that can regulate or maintain the volts for 220 even if I use an old school manual throttle cable to keep the rpms up. I will need some kind of gauge and mount it inside the truck on the dash to show me the volts the generator head is putting out. Not sure where to buy this gauge even if they make them anymore.

No, that hillbilly scheme never worked. You hold volts by holding RPM constant, and you can't do that with a throttle lock, you need a proper governor for that. If you ever tore down a Briggs engine, that funny thing between the "throttle" and the carburetor is the governor. Even then, such service will thrash the engine and result in an early engine rebuild - so that's no savings at all compared to a Craigslist generator or gas welder. You know people throw stuff out that can be easily fixed.

I know a little about older cars and trucks back in the good old days up to early 1960s cars/ trucks had manually adjustable voltage regulators and if you got this wrong you melted lots of wires.

Nice try, but that doesn't help you at all. It seems clever but only until you try it and find out it only makes things worse.

Old voltage regulators were terrible in every way, there was nothing good, useful or hackable about them. Electronic regulators are better period.

I was looking for a thing that is like a generator head but it puts out DC current and it makes different amps depending on the rpms the motor turns cuz that would be the way for me to go but not sure if they such a thing. IF anyone has any ideas please let me know.

Not possible because it's not that simple.

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If doing the welding a lot, as in a job/work situation, I would suggest a diesel welder/generator. Will have a good welder plus the electric power to run other tools at the same time.

For the odd job out in a field, would suggest a smaller generator and one of those inverter welders that don't take as much electric amps from a generator, but have the output you want.

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Doing it your self, could be complicated and expensive.

A car battery could produce a 140 Amp arc, or two, then it will be empty.

More than getting a generator.

the Westinghouse WGen6000 Portable Generator with a running wattage of 6000 watts and surge wattage of 7500 watts will be the best solution to run your 140 amp welders.

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  • 1
    Those recommendations won't even get close. To provide 140A @ 220V, that's 30.8KW of power, which around 5x what your suggested generator can provide.
    – Milwrdfan
    Jun 27 at 3:18
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    It doesn’t change the answer, but the output amperage stated for stick welding isn’t at the input line voltage. For example, for the common Lincoln 225 “tombstone” welder, the transformer input might be 50 amps at 240v, but the output voltage is closer to 50-70v at the rated 225 amps.
    – Tim B
    Jun 27 at 4:09
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    @Milwrdfan not quite correct. Typically, a 110V welder uses about 20 – 30 amps and produces up to 140 amps.
    – Ruskes
    Jun 27 at 4:11

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