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Can you /should you use a roller to apply a finish to hardwood floor (parquet in my case)? I am seeing lots of videos with guys using a rag to apply the stain, that looks very tedious and time consuming and I am not sure if it is evenly applied this way

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    By "rug", do you mean "rag"? Note that this is the way stains are traditionally applied to everything from door/window trim to large furniture to floors. It has to be wiped on, allowed to soak in until the desired color is reached, then the excess wiped off. An even coat is achieved by an even soak in time and consistent wipe off.
    – FreeMan
    May 23, 2022 at 14:49
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    Again, I'd suggest a tour through the stain tag at Woodworking to learn a lot about application and what happens if you don't do things right.
    – FreeMan
    May 23, 2022 at 14:51
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    yes I fixed that, it is rag. Will have a look at woodworking
    – MiniMe
    May 23, 2022 at 14:53
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    Also, remember that wood is a natural product, so the stain will soak into some pieces more than it will others. You won't end up with a perfectly even finish. If you do, frankly, it will look like it was painted (with wood grain added), which probably isn't what you want. Don't sweat it too much - this is one place where perfection isn't perfect.
    – FreeMan
    May 23, 2022 at 14:59
  • I changed the other related question and added a picture -it is not exactly as you say, I think it is worse diy.stackexchange.com/questions/249768/…
    – MiniMe
    May 23, 2022 at 15:23

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Stain is not paint. It's intended to be absorbed into the top layer of the wood, not to form a coating on top of the wood.
So although I guess you could apply it with a roller, you'd still need to rub off the excess which doesn't get absorbed - in which case why not just apply it with the same 'tool' you're already using to rub with?

Note that the way I'm using the term 'stain' refers to a product which is only intended to change the color of the wood. It is not a protective or sealing product like a polyurethane. Sometimes some people do also refer to these protective coatings as a "stain" even when they don't have any color to them - which is IMO incorrect and causes confusion.

Judging by one of your other questions you're comparing outdoor deck "stain" with indoor floor stain and getting caught by this differing use of terminology.
You'll find that if someone is spraying "stain" onto an outdoor deck, then it is almost certainly not really just a "stain" product, but is in fact a protective wood sealing product which may have some degree of color in it (or not, depending on the product).

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    Frankly, if you don't wipe off the excess stain, you'll be waiting weeks (if not longer) for it to all dry to the point of being usable. It might not ever dry to a usable state if there's too much left on.
    – FreeMan
    May 23, 2022 at 14:48

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