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This is a followup to Can you identify these things in my wall?

Once I realized what I was seeing was the back side of aluminum siding, I started going to town ripping out drywall - and dirty, disgusting fiberglass.

Please see the below image. The blue arrows point to holes in the outside wall (e.g. you can touch the back of the aluminum siding through them). The red square shows a section is that outright crumbling.

There is no house wrap on the outside.

I have someone coming to give me a quote new siding (which.. I'll make sure they understand they're going to have to replace the outer layer of at least this wall, and that I expect proper house wrap) - but I can't even get that until April 16th - who knows how long until they're actually able to install.

I've obviously got more drywall and fiberglass to remove, but given how long it is going to take to get this fixed properly... what is a good method to at least temporarily seal this off (to block exterior air and insects - there were a ton of stink bugs in the wall)?

I don't feel like I'm going to be able to screw anything into the black OSB looking stuff - it's incredibly crumbly.

For the holes, I could probably use spray foam to fill them for now (I don't care if it damages the black material, or the siding the outside). That long crack in the red concerns me, though.

enter image description here

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  • What kind of timeframe are we talking about here for a permanent solution? If it's weeks to a few months, you can probably get away with careful application of duct tape. Make sure you clean the surrounding surface, and occasionally check if it starts peeling due to weathering (after which you simply apply new duct tape).
    – MiG
    Apr 4 at 16:49
  • @MiG Apr 16 is earliest as it says…
    – Solar Mike
    Apr 4 at 16:51
  • That's for the quote, not actual construction folk building :)
    – MiG
    Apr 4 at 16:51
  • @MiG: The same folks are doing my ridge vent - which had to be scheduled 4 months in advance. So I imagine it's going to be a little while. :(
    – negacao
    Apr 4 at 16:53
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    Back in the olden times we used the black fibre board and tar paper for house wrap. The board is just compressed fibres, maybe a 1/2 inch thick. Depending on your weather might think about maybe nailing 2x2s to the 2x4s and increase your R value of insulation space in the walls. Seems like you will have the chance either inside or outside.
    – crip659
    Apr 4 at 17:09

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I have remodeled quite a few homes for a temporary seal some sheet plastic stapled on the studs would be sufficient.

it helps to create a dead air space and provide a tiny bit of insulation,

if you live in a windy area staple at every stud if not around the outside I usually roll the outside edge to provide 2 or more thickness of plastic,

the longer I expect the plastic to be in place the thicker I get, I have used the super thin painters plastic for overnight but added some paint stirs to keep the staples from pulling through the plastic.

This keeps drafts out and although looks like a construction zone my wife can handle plastic when I am saving for the next part of the job.

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