6

We are remodeling our kitchen and putting new windows in. It will be a bank of 3 windows. We plan on doing a king & jack in between each window (to not have to do one very long header). I would like to have hardwired sconces in between the windows but also have the minimum amount of space between the windows (for the king & jack and lights). How is this done? What is the minimum amount of space to put all of that in the wall?

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2
  • 2x4 or 2x6 framing? Are you replacing the headers?
    – isherwood
    Commented Mar 24, 2022 at 14:48
  • It depends on how wide your sconce mounts/mounting brackets are. A king stud and jack stud on either side will be 4 and a half inches of "wall surface", not accounting for any surface trim you may want around the windows.
    – TylerH
    Commented Mar 24, 2022 at 16:58

3 Answers 3

7

For the minimum amount of space between windows you can run the headers to a shared king, with a jack on either side of the king.

Then furr out the wall by 1.5 inches and install a shallow device or outlet box in front of the king/jacks. You can just furr out the verticals between the windows, providing a "post" look, or furr out the entire wall and have deeper frames & sills.

This will save you 5.5 inches over the alternative of having a 4 inch box placed between two kings.

If the windows are cased with 0.5" drywall, add 1" for drywall, and perhaps .5" for the corner bead. If 0.5" MDF/timber casing is used instead, there will be no corner bead.

Some exterior walls are already 2x4 plus furring, in stead of 2x6. If your wall is 2x6, load calculations for your new framing will tell you whether you can trim it back to 2x4 plus furring.

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  • 3
    Great answer to the question that was asked. But .... if you really get it down THIS narrow and put sconces in between ... make sure you plan to use "inside the frame" blinds and not any other kind of window treatment that would end up touching the sconces. And make sure the sconces themselves are equally narrow so they don't interfere with your ability to open/remove/clean the windows. You probably should do a mockup of the finished product before building your windows in a way that's so sensitive to everything fitting perfectly.
    – jay613
    Commented Mar 24, 2022 at 17:26
  • @jay613 good point, I edited to make sure OP budgets the casing in their overall considerations.
    – P2000
    Commented Mar 25, 2022 at 3:35
4

You would need to install an electrical box between the studs. Typically you would use a 4" octagonal box for the lights. This would result in:

1½" JS + 1½" KS + 4" Box + 1½" KS + 1½" JS = 10"

-----------------------------------
-----------------------------------Top Plates
-----------------------------------
        |  |  |       |  |  |
        |  |  |       |  |  |
        |  |  |       |  |  |
        |  |  |       |  |  |
        |  |  |       |  |  |
  ---------|  |       |  |---------
           |  |       |  |
    Header |  |       |  | Header
           |  |       |  |
           |  |       |  |
   --------|  |       |  |---------
        |  |  |       |  |  |
 Window |  |  | /––-\ |  |  | Window
        |  |  | |BOX| |  |  |
        |  |  | \___/ |  |  |
        |  |  |       |  |  |
        |JS|KS|       |KS|JS|
        
        |-------10"---------|
5
  • 4
    3+4+3 = 10. Unless, of course, this is "new math" or "my truth is my truth no matter what science says".
    – FreeMan
    Commented Mar 24, 2022 at 11:36
  • It's only 8" if you use 1" JS/KS, not 1-1/2". But if you share them while using 1-1/2", you'll be down 1-1/2" which totals 8-1/2".
    – Mast
    Commented Mar 24, 2022 at 13:20
  • I've corrected the math. 1" studs may be legal, but are not common. At any rate, the answer doesn't mention that.
    – isherwood
    Commented Mar 24, 2022 at 14:47
  • Sorry, it was meant to be 10. I don't know how or wye I typed 8. Thanks for correcting it.
    – pdd
    Commented Mar 24, 2022 at 16:06
  • 1
    You can drill through the stud and use a shallow dish that is surface mounted, no? No need to create a cavity between two kings that you then have to fire block and insulate.
    – TylerH
    Commented Mar 24, 2022 at 16:53
0

If you have 2x6 framing, and if you're replacing the headers (allowing reconfiguration), you could recess shallow light boxes into the post assemblies. This can be done fairly easily with a router. Channels for cables could also be routed into the king stud at window height.

Keep in mind that you need space for your window casing, so this may not be suitable. However, a plinth block as a sconce backplate fit between upper and lower casing could look very nice and would eliminate the need to recess the light boxes. Just the cabling would need chases cut.

-----------------------------------
----------------------------------- <-- wall plates
-----------------------------------
           |  |
           |  |
           |  |<-- shared king stud
           |  |  
           |  |  
  ---------|  |---------------
           |  |
    header |  |  header
           |  | 
           |  |
   --------|  |----------------
        |  |  |  |   
        | /––-\  |   
        | |BOX | |   
        | \___/  | <-- trimmer stud
        |  |  |  |
        |  |  |  |
0

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