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Not sure if this is a useful picture but I have some copper pipe that is green with corrosion / oxidation and wondering if this is something I should replace. And what the cause would be? Is it galvanic or something else?

Here’s another photo with example of nearby solder joints.

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    Condensation, if you're lucky.
    – Mazura
    Feb 15 at 8:04
  • What is its function? There's obviously a lot of PEX here, and this pipe appears to be considerably older. It probably is just condensation and old-age. No sign of a joint nearby with corrosive flux not removed or that sort of thing.
    – Ecnerwal
    Feb 15 at 13:42
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    Then again, if you have the wrong sort of water chemistry, this might be the only pipe that hasn't yet been replaced due to the water eating pinholes from the inside...does it drip?
    – Ecnerwal
    Feb 15 at 14:33
  • Many things can cause corrosion Sheetrock/drywall shortly after hurricane Katrina imported from china was known to cause this but I would lean to moisture because it is much worse on 1 end compared to the other.
    – Ed Beal
    Feb 15 at 20:49
  • @Ecnerwal function is to carry cold water from near the house’s water main entrance to a few faucets — mostly kitchen. The house is probably around 60-80% PEX at this point at least and I’m trying to decide if I should remove it as well. Feb 16 at 2:02

2 Answers 2

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For the solder joints, get a nice hot (but not scalding) bucket of water (perhaps with a spoonful of baking soda in it) and a rag and wipe them down if they are particularly green - that is generally failure to remove/clean flux after soldering.

Nothing there looks particularly dire - the above is basically preventative maintenance to reduce any further corrosion from leftover flux before it becomes an issue. It's finally doing what the person who soldered these should have done, probably decades ago (nice char on the framing, too!)

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  • Thanks. I’ll try this. Feb 16 at 4:32
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Not galvanic, most likely cosmetic/surface. Apparently it is occasionally wet with condensation. If it is wetted from a leak somewhere else, you have a different problem. I would clean it with sandpaper and watch it to determine how it is getting wet.

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