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I just recently learned that some wall/ceiling textures can be applied with a paint-roller and special texture "paint".

Here are a couple examples from Home Depot:

alt text alt text

I was hoping to get more information on this technique. I'd specifically like to know:

  • What types of texture patterns are available using this method? Some types look like they could be done by either rolled-on or spray (e.g. Perlite).
  • How do the finished results compare to other texturing methods? Is there a noticeable difference in quality?
  • Is there a cost benefit for rolled-on textures?
  • Is a rolled-on texture easier for beginners to apply?

-M

  • Looks like this one is a toughie so I'm placing a bounty =). Can't seem to find any resources online either and the contractors I've spoken with aren't readily familiar with it. – Mike B Oct 28 '10 at 15:51
  • what is a rolled on wall texture? You may not be getting answers because people dont know what it is. Is it like the textures you typically see in ceilings? – mohlsen Oct 28 '10 at 16:55
  • @mohlsen I'm referring to textures that can be applied via a paint roller instead of more traditional methods like a hopper gun. – Mike B Oct 28 '10 at 17:12
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    Just a note - Make sure you have all of the conduit / utilities that you need inside of the wall before you apply the texture. Patching holes in textured walls is very difficult to do seamlessly. – James Van Huis Oct 28 '10 at 21:24
  • People will be forever wondering if the texture is asbestos based. – Wayfaring Stranger Jan 7 at 22:00
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+50

Here is a short HOWTO article that answers some of your questions: http://tlc.howstuffworks.com/home/painting-interiors9.htmt

Here are a series of HOWTO's from BEHR's product pages: BEHR's Texture Painting HOWTO's

Here is another one from a specific product page: http://www.skalflex.com/products/texturePaints/interior.html

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Rolled on texture is easy for anyone who can paint. However, do not get that pre-mixed stuff. It's nearly impossible to get it to a good consistency. Go with the texture additive that you mix in yourself. Just wear some old clothes because tiny bits of the texture are going to shoot off the roller and get on you (more so for a ceiling job).

All you need to do is pay attention to the texture coverage. Rolling vertical and coming back over on a horizontal to get uniform coverage. I'll do the texture in the first coat then do another coat without the texture to cover up any unpainted texture bits that are barely stuck to the wall.

  • Thanks! Can you answer my other questions too? 1) What types of texture patterns are available using this method? 2) How do the finished results compare to other texturing methods? 3) Is there a noticeable difference in quality? 4) Is there a cost benefit for rolled-on textures? – Mike B Oct 28 '10 at 21:02
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    Well, it's cheap, easy, and the only way I've ever done it. I don't think you can do any kind of patterns with a roller. – dotjoe Oct 28 '10 at 23:28
  • They do make a roller specific for "globbing" on drywall mud, not paint. I've done knockdown with it with almost no noticeable difference between the spray and rolled. – Micah Montoya Jan 7 at 14:12

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