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When installing a toilet why is so important to have the flange/flange extender level when the wax ring can compensate for that ? What is the level error accepted ? In my opinion if you use a jumbo wax ring that should allow a lot of play in this respect

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  • I don't follow what you mean by "flange extender". I have ever only seen, and done myself, doubling up of wax rings when needed or using a extra thick in some cases, or using a thick and thin combined if that is what was needed. The trick is build up enough thickness to give the toilet something to compress in the recess in the bottom of the toilet. I usually go for more than an inch above the finished floor, since the recess is about 3/4" deep. If the wax ring makes it so you have to push down lightly to get the toilet to seat, that's my sign it is sealed.
    – Jack
    Jan 8, 2022 at 16:33
  • homedepot.ca/product/… here they use the term
    – MiniMe
    Jan 8, 2022 at 16:37
  • Son of a gun, never seen one.... It get the flange up to the level of the finish floor, like it is supposed to be to begin with, but since renovations do occur and the flanges are not raised, that is where these can come into play. OR... you can double up the wax rings.
    – Jack
    Jan 8, 2022 at 16:43

2 Answers 2

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I have ever only seen, and done myself, doubling up of wax rings when needed or using a extra thick in some cases, or using a thick and thin combined if that is what was needed. The trick is build up enough thickness to give the toilet something to compress in the recess in the bottom of the toilet. I usually go for more than an inch above the finished floor, since the recess is about 3/4" deep. If the wax ring makes it so you have to push down lightly to get the toilet to seat, that's my sign it is sealed.

The link in the comment you provided help a lot. The flange extender is to get the flange up to the level of the finish floor, like it is supposed to be to begin with, but since renovations do occur and the flanges are not raised, that is where these can come into play. OR... you can double up the wax rings.

The flange or flange extender.... itself does not need to be perfectly level, just mounted securely. Yes, the wax ring can make up for any "unlevelness". Ideally the toilet should be set level, and if the floor is level and flat, it makes it so much easier. Before setting the wax ring and before setting the tank, place the toilet in position to see how it sets. If it rock to ANY degree shim it so it does not. Place shims where the ceramic is the strongest. There are 3 places to work with, the front and the areas behind the floor mounting bolts. When adding shims, place them so they will level the seat if needed. mark the floor and the depth the shims are set.

I usually add shims all around when setting the toilet, that way the wax ring is never fully compressed while I hover over the toilet setting the nuts on the flange bolts, setting the tank, adjusting it square to the wall. When all is ready, then I lower the toilet the rest of the way until the marks are seen on the shim or shims that are to be left in place after all other shims are removed. Then compress the wax ring the rest of the way and snug down the flange bolts. Make sure the plastic isolator is to the ceramic with the washer on top of that and not any ceramic to metal contact. Also if the tile does have a high spot at the set of the toilet, that is a spot prone to chipping. Be very careful of that....

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The error level accepted is simply whether it leaks or not. Toilets are designed for the standard wax ring and the flange is meant to be installed on top of the finished floor, which should be level. Yes, using a jumbo wax ring will allow play but getting the toilet to sit totally flat on the floor will present a problem. I've seen people crack their toilet trying to bolt it down to the floor when jumbo wax rings were used. Try to install it level with the floor. The extenders were designed to accommodate an addition to the original floor and should be installed level for the same reasons.

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