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I have a recessed dimmable ceiling light with the clips as below. Sometimes the light is very bright, and I want to disperse over a larger area.

Is there a product to install a cone plastic shade (like they have with those inexpensive lamps they sell at Walmart/Target) below? However, be able to screw on into the ceiling upside side down? Or is there an accessory shade product I can install with Recessed ceiling lights (maybe drum shade)?

Reason: I want a bright light over 1500 lumens, however wanted it dispersed over a large area. I am sensitive to sharp lights concentrated in a small area. Globe lights do not give the same issue.

Just curious of a product like that exists, and hopefully it can be secured with the actual orange clips of the ceiling light.

Ceiling Light:

enter image description here

enter image description here

Plastic Shade:

enter image description here

enter image description here

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  • Analternative: Most light fixtures have removable bulbs. If this one has a removable bulb, replace the existing bulb with one that produces less light. Dec 10, 2021 at 1:04
  • You need a different or more ceiling lights in your room. Unaware of anything like you describe that "funnels" light around. A track light with multiple light heads pointing in different directions would disperse the light further into the room, for example. Can lights or the ceiling light that you have is not designed to light an entire room. Multiple can lights will also do the job.
    – DAS
    Dec 10, 2021 at 5:11
  • Remove the inner can and now it's just a junction box for w/e light your heart desires (as long as it's larger than a can light hole and you've some way to mount it). You'd need to know how to 'do stuff' though.
    – Mazura
    Dec 10, 2021 at 6:20
  • Please add a picture of your actual ceiling where we can see the type of cavity, junction box, wiring or existing light, and, if already purchased, the actual lights you wish to use.
    – P2000
    Dec 10, 2021 at 17:48
  • its the second picture above
    – mattsmith5
    Dec 10, 2021 at 17:55

2 Answers 2

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In the first image, the outer circle is the "trim ring" and the inner circle is the "diffuser". What you want is a less transparent/more opaque diffuser.

I would suggest that you go to a photography store (where they sell pro-level equipment) and get some filter material, often referred to as "gels". You'd probably want a Neutral Density (ND) filter, as this will reduce the light but not affect the color. Place the filter on the inside of the trim ring, tape it in place, then put the trim ring back up. You'd be able to buy it in sheets, then cut it to size - talk with the sales folks there, they'll direct you to the right material in the right size.

ND filters come in varying densities, each blocking more light than the previous. You may want to buy a couple of different densities, or enough to make several layers for each light fixture. You'll end up experimenting with the different densities or number of layers to achieve the light level you're after.

These gels are designed to work over very hot photography/cinematography lighting, so they should be able to handle the reasonably low temps in your LED can.

Do note, though, that this is a semi-permanent solution (you can take down the trim ring and remove the gel, but that involves a ladder - not something you're going to want to do once a day or once a week), while you indicate that:

Sometimes the light is very bright, and I want to disperse over a larger area.
Emphasis mine

If the light is only sometimes too bright, maybe you need to install dimmable lights and a compatible dimmer so you can simply turn them down when they're too bright.

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  • +1 for the dimmer suggestion, and if you get a good LED dimmer and not just the cheapest off-the-shelf garbage that was made for incandescent lights you'll have an incredibly smooth brightness curve. Dec 10, 2021 at 16:09
  • I already have a dimmer
    – mattsmith5
    Dec 10, 2021 at 17:37
  • err, thanks for the response, however, this doesn't answer question directly, I want bright light, however wanted it over a large area, globe lights do not give me the same issue
    – mattsmith5
    Dec 10, 2021 at 17:40
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    Based on the recent edit, @mattsmith5, I see that now. I'd suggest a different style/brand of light in the first place that has the type of globe you're after. You've probably got limited availability of aftermarket items.
    – FreeMan
    Dec 10, 2021 at 17:56
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    Ah. These would have been really helpful details to have included in the original question. Would have saved everyone a lot of time, @mattsmith5.
    – FreeMan
    Dec 10, 2021 at 17:59
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For the brightest and best results, the light does not have to be dimmed and diffusers can be installed that are spaced from the light source.

The light shown is a recessed puck light with (very likely) a low voltage wire leading to separate small metal junction box (often placed loose in the ceiling cavity) that includes the regulator electronics and some space for splicing & connecting to the mains.

The red tabs in your picture are clamps that go behind the ceiling material (wood, drywall). Through a spring action they hold the fixture by clamping from above and pulling the light's flange against the ceiling for a tight fit.

The lights shown have a built-in diffuser, but not all ceiling LED lights have it. Some are designed for a GU type bulb and some (like yours) have an integrated non-replaceable bulb.

To add (more) diffusion, you need some diffusing material and a standoff. Layering a diffusion sheet against a light that already has a diffuser (as shown in your picture) will only dim it, not diffuse the light. If that's all you want, then a dimmer is probably best.

If you want to maintain the light strength but diffuse how it enters your room, then you need a stand off. The bowl shape, as you suggest, accomplishes that, as would a diffuser sheet with standoff legs. The challenge here is mounting it, since no provisions are made in the existing fixture.

It's tricky and you have to experiment with the specific light and diffuser, and your level of skill.

There are a few options:

  • "Hook" : drill a small hole in the your diffuser of choice, and use a hook (e.g. an "S shaped hook") to get between the light's flange and the ceiling. As an alternative you can use metal wire, or a small chain. The mounting pressure from the spring lamps may suffice to hold the hook or chain squeezed between the light flange and the ceiling. Alternatively screw a small hook to the ceiling and hang the chain from it.

For a stable chain mount you'd need 3 mounting points, and for a rod mount probably 2 suffice.

  • "Glue" : glue a standoff rod (metal coupling nut, wood dowling) of about 1 inch to the diffuser and to the ceiling. Depending on the diffuser material, glueing to it may not be an option (LDPE and HDPE), and instead you have to drive a screw through the diffuser into one end of the standoff, and glue the other end the ceiling. Hold in place with painter's tape while the glue dries.

You can use these techniques to mount a diffuser bowl, a disk or even a small lamp shade (with light entering from above), and modify the technique for the weight.

Round diffuser disks are found under the description "Diffuser for pendant shades - Polypropylene - Natural white". Using photography diffuser or gels are also an option, but you have to cut them to size, and cutting round shapes is not for everyone.

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  • I already have a dimmer
    – mattsmith5
    Dec 10, 2021 at 17:37
  • Reason: I want a bright light over 1500 lumens, however wanted it dispersed over a large area. I am sensitive to sharp lights concentrated in a small area. Globe lights do not give the same issue.
    – mattsmith5
    Dec 10, 2021 at 17:42
  • if you don't need dimming, and you want a diffuser, either your current light has provisions for it (unlikely) or you have to get creative (see my answer). What is it in my answer that doesn't work for you? Are those lights not what you already have? Why not just get the globe light you want?
    – P2000
    Dec 10, 2021 at 17:44
  • I have a dimmer, cannot install globe light, apartment complex rules etc
    – mattsmith5
    Dec 10, 2021 at 17:55
  • I think you have to get more specific about the "etc" so we know what your restrictions are, see my comment under your question. So what is it in my answer that doesn't work for you?
    – P2000
    Dec 10, 2021 at 17:57

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