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I’m about to replace some of the brass water pipes to PEX in my basement. I bought an adapter fitting at a plumbing supply store(picture 1) and cut the cold water pipe(picture 2). I tried to remove the pipe from the old fitting in order to install the adapter (picture 3). The problem is the pipe stuck in the fitting. I used heat gun to melt the glue down but it doesn’t work. I don’t know what kind of glue the plumbers used in 1947. It’s very strong. Please give me some advice.

enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

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  • 1
    That's not "glue" it's "pipe dope". It's designed to waterproof the threads.
    – FreeMan
    Dec 3 '21 at 14:51
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    Possibly a hardening product like a "Permatex". Dec 3 '21 at 16:15
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I'm a plumber in Texas and we see that slot The old timers used linseed oil and cement to seal those joints. I won't even waste my time with pipe wrenches because you won't unscrew the pipe. Cut the pipe close to the fitting. With a sawzall and a small cutting blade. Notch the inside of the pipe in four places and chisel it out with a small screwdriver.

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You need two pipe wrenches - one for the pipe and one for the fitting so you don’t damage the other pipes.

However, I would likely go with a solder fitting to get to what you want if that is so tight.

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  • A little heat would probably soften the thread compound.
    – isherwood
    Dec 3 '21 at 15:35
  • @isherwood OP mentions heat in the original post, but a louisiana spanner would probably provide more...
    – Solar Mike
    Dec 3 '21 at 15:43
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    Thanks. Missed that. To clarify, a lot of heat, like what a plumber's torch would provide. The pipe itself need to be quite warm to the touch. I suspect that the heat gun wasn't adequately implemented.
    – isherwood
    Dec 3 '21 at 15:46
  • @isherwood Couldn't a lot of heat affect adjacent joints and cause those joints to start leaking unless you could re-tighten them as well?
    – MonkeyZeus
    Dec 3 '21 at 18:44
  • I wouldn't think so unless they were rotated, breaking the bond. I have limited thread compound experience, though.
    – isherwood
    Dec 3 '21 at 19:14
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This looks like a crack in the T fitting:

Image of Fitting

If so you should replace it.

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  • 1
    True (though I think it's just a stain), but not an answer. Should've been a comment.
    – isherwood
    Dec 3 '21 at 15:15
  • True, @isherwood, but it's hard to include an image in a comment. Though a link would do the trick.
    – FreeMan
    Dec 3 '21 at 15:32
  • No it's not (you can upload in an answer box if you like and copy the URL). And that's not an excuse to violate site rules.
    – isherwood
    Dec 3 '21 at 15:33
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    I believe it is an answer. If the fitting it cracked, then it should be replaced. That overrides the original problem of how to remove the fitting.
    – jwh20
    Dec 3 '21 at 15:48
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    A person would still need to know how to replace it, which was the question. I don't think I'm being overly pedantic here.
    – isherwood
    Dec 3 '21 at 15:54

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