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House info: 1960s ranch; basement below, attic above

Project: Remove existing window, and reframe wall for larger window in exterior load bearing wall; portion of exterior wall framing removed during work will span about 6 ft.

Temp support: Spans about 8 feet, 3 feet from wall to be worked on; top plate is a 2x8; studs currently 24in o.c. with the middle three directly beneath ceiling joists, and stud on the far right is off by a couple inches because the bottom plate ran out. Everything fastened with construction screws (diagonal/toescrewing)

My questions:

Is the diagonal bracing installed okay; I see temp walls built without this, but figured it couldn't hurt

Is it more important that the studs be 16 o.c. or fall beneath the ceiling joists? Should I reposition/add more studs?

temporary support wall

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    which way to the floor joists run? And where did you get the 3ft number from? Seems high to me, but I am not a framer. I put the temp support almost at the exterior wall, since it's needed only for the framing phase, not finishing, as long as you can slide in the beam/header.
    – P2000
    Nov 20, 2021 at 18:26
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    Thanks! I believe the floor joists are perpendicular to the temporary support, but need to double check. The 3ft number is not official just what I've seen different sources recommend ("a few feet"). I've also seen "as close as practicable" and your point about it only needing to be in place for header placement is well taken. I'll move it closer.
    – smashh1223
    Nov 20, 2021 at 18:32
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    Yes, as long as you get the framing done before snow fall, before holiday parties in the attic, or before any delivery of a grand piano for the upstairs bedroom ;) It's also better to preload the beam, meaning you should lift the top plate with a jackb before removing the old framing, just to the point that you hear the first cracking, and release it once the new header & studs are in place, but before the new window is installed.
    – P2000
    Nov 21, 2021 at 6:24
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    The bottom plate of your temp wall should brace several joists, or sit on a beam, but not longitudinally along one joist or worst of all between joists on sub-floor.
    – P2000
    Nov 22, 2021 at 1:15
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    ok, I put it all together into an answer. Good luck! If you have any further questions about framing or finishing, I hope we hear from you again.
    – P2000
    Nov 22, 2021 at 6:56

2 Answers 2

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I think you have enough I rarely go beyond 4’ why 4’ because cut a 8’ or standard stud and just short of 4’. The diagonal brace can’t hurt but it is not really helping either the exterior sheathing is keeping it solid. I have done this many times and never had a problem.

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  • Ed, which 4 ft?
    – P2000
    Nov 20, 2021 at 20:58
  • Looking at the photo and the op mentioned support was perpendicular to the joists the only problem I ever had when I was remodeling a home that the top and bottom plates were not properly lapped as required but my support did prevent any damage.
    – Ed Beal
    Nov 20, 2021 at 21:05
  • Ok so that's 4ft extending past the proposed opening? And your thought on the 3ft from wall?
    – P2000
    Nov 20, 2021 at 21:09
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I put the temp support as close as possible to the exterior wall, since it's needed only for the framing phase, not finishing. You should leave just enough space to slide in the new beam/header over the new window.

Your studs are spaced about 24 o.c. which should be fine, even if the existing wall is studded at 16. After all, this is a temporary wall, and you have control over the loading: get the framing done before snow fall, avoid holiday parties in the attic, and delay any delivery of a grand piano for the upstairs bedroom ;). The point is: temporary support needs to hold a predictable and often lighter load, and only for a short period.

It's also better to preload the new beam, meaning you should lift the top plate of the temporary wall with a jack before removing the old framing, just to the point that you hear the first cracking, and release it once the new header & studs are in place, but before the new window is installed. This ensures that the new header and studs are bearing the load without undue deformation of other structural members, and it also ensures that the the window frame is not bearing load.

The bottom plate of your temp wall should brace several floor joists, or sit on a beam, but it should not run longitudinally over top one joist or, worst of all, between joists on sub-floor. If your bottom plate is perpendicular to the floor joists you are fine. The load on the wall will transfer to several floor joists and via the joists transfer to the foundation.

A diagonal brace for the temp wall is not needed because the existing wall does not appear to be a shear wall. That said, it is all a matter of risk management: if you are not renovating into storm or tornado season, or if feel you can dodge a major earthquake then there is no reason to add the shear brace, but it also does no harm.

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