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I have a Malber dryer (model TD700). They don't make them anymore. The door switch is broken. I would like to replace it. I can't buy a Malber one because they don't make them. I don't care if the door switch just is always "on", meaning opening the door won't work to stop the machine, I just need something that will make my dryer work. For now I just used tape to hold together the contact points. Can someone help me with which kind of door switch I need?

Attached is a photo of the door switch.
enter image description here

This is a picture of the sticker on the aback of the dryer: enter image description here

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    Can you get us clear photos of the labeling on the switch please? Oct 20 at 2:03
  • Weird. A Swiss branded dryer, built in Italy that runs on 11V @ 60Hz and requires a 15A breaker? Makes me wonder what country it's installed in...
    – FreeMan
    Oct 25 at 14:38
  • @FreeMan USA :)
    – Burt
    Oct 27 at 3:22
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As commented, it's really hard to tell with such poor photos.

However, it does look like a pretty bog-standard microswitch, such at this

Microswitch with arm

or without the arm

Microswitch without arm

I'd just look for one with the correct dimensions.

  • For voltage, they're mostly rated for 250VAC, but just ensure the one you buy is.
  • For current rating, it's hard to say without details from the pic, but judging by the burnt nature of the one you're replacing, I'd say it's underrated. Best to assume it's switching the whole load, so greater than (Total Dryer Power in Watts/Mains Voltage) Amps is required. Minimizing how often you open the door whilst it's running will minimize the chance of it burning out again, although with a properly-sized switch, it should not be a problem
  • You may need to experiment to get the right normally open / normally closed contact.

Edit after new photo's. The power is 1480W, Voltage is 110V, so the current would be 1480/110 = 13.45A, so I'd suggest a 16A one.

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  • Would this one seem to fit the requirements? amazon.com/Twidec-Action-Button-Microwave-V-15-1C25/dp/…
    – Burt
    Oct 21 at 19:58
  • @Burt - They look OK, yes, provided that the physical dimensions are correct.
    – SiHa
    Oct 21 at 20:07
  • Thanks. How do I know the physical size I need?
    – Burt
    Oct 21 at 20:15
  • @Burt - Measure it. The The link you provided has the L/W/H in the description and you have the dead one. Comparing it to the tags for scale, though, I'm 99% sure they'll fit.
    – SiHa
    Oct 21 at 20:19
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    This worked great! Thank you
    – Burt
    Oct 22 at 18:56
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I never heard of Malber before, but a quick search shows that at least some parts are available. If the parts are standard enough (as is often the case for older washer and dryer parts) then even if Malber doesn't make/sell the part, somebody else might. The only way to find out is with the specific model # (TD700 from comment), as replacement switches may vary with the size of the dryer and/or model year.

Unfortunately, Malber parts are very few & far between online, at least in my searches. I'd suggest taking the part to a local appliance parts store to see if someone knows what can replace it. Not a big box store (Home Depot, Lowes, etc.), appliance retail store or hardware store - a place that sells parts to appliance installers/repairmen.

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  • The dryer model is TD700. Thanks for your help.
    – Burt
    Oct 20 at 11:24
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    @Burt FYI, model info belongs in the question where everyone reading will find it. I've edited it in for you. In the future, it will help all concerned if you can remember to do that, and if you forget, just click the edit text under you answer and add it in later.
    – FreeMan
    Oct 20 at 12:04
  • I tried buying this part: amazon.com/gp/product/B01N43YS2K/… but it doesn't fit. I can't seem to figure out where to buy one that does fit.
    – Burt
    Oct 20 at 16:51
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A dryer with an inoperative switch will run continuously when the top-panel controls say "Start." That means that when you open the door of the running machine, the drum will keep rotating until you change the top-panel control settings to "Stop." This may result in clean clothes on the floor, or a damaged hand as the user reaches inside the turning drum.

But if you're content to use a dryer with an inoperative switch so the machine thinks the door is closed all the time, just cut the connectors off the two wires to the switch, strip the ends, and connect the wires together, using a wirenut (hardware store item). The dead switch won't be a part of the circuit, so it can be removed or left in place.

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    I didn't downvote, but I am concerned that depending on design, the switch wires could carry significant power. If they do, soldering is not advisable (for most people) as you need a really good connection (wire nut is fine) to avoid a "high-resistance = overheat & burn up" connection. Oct 20 at 2:17
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    Also, most people are in the habit of "door open" = "drum stops rotating" and will, at a minimum, end up with clean clothes on the floor, and at worst, injure themselves by reaching into the rotating drum. Granted, the OP seems to be fine with the idea, but it's best not to recommend something like this because others will read it in the future and may not be as careful as this poster.
    – FreeMan
    Oct 20 at 12:06
  • @manassehkatz-Moving2Codidact A good point, thanks. I'll edit the answer. Oct 20 at 14:28
  • @FreeMan Thanks. Also a good point, edited as well. Oct 20 at 14:29

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