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the silver connector in the pic not able to unassemble, it just turns together with the bottom pipe, I have no idea how can I remove it. Any idea? Thanks a lot!

slip joint nut from above

slip joint nut from above, but slightly to the side

enter image description here

enter image description here

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  • I'd cut it all out and re-plumb. That goofy connection is going to leak and you can do it right, with the proper connectors for a few bucks.
    – gnicko
    Oct 8, 2021 at 3:54
  • Thanks for your reply, so what connector should I use to replace that nut?
    – Brian Z
    Oct 8, 2021 at 3:58
  • 1
    It's difficult to say exactly what you need because of the close-up pictures. I'm thinking pull the pipes out and buy a trap kit. It's the "right" way to make the connection and only cost you $10 or so. Post a picture from further back so we can see the whole assembly and I'll add a detailed answer regarding what all you need and how to do it.
    – gnicko
    Oct 8, 2021 at 4:02
  • Just uploaded the pic. So, cut from the end of the pipe, and replace a whole trap kit. was trying to remove the Charlotte pipe from the end pipe, but it's very tight.
    – Brian Z
    Oct 8, 2021 at 13:49
  • I'd guess the "Charlotte" pipe is glued on. You might have to cut the "end" pipe that's connected to the "Charlotte" pipe right a the point where it connects. That will "rob" you of about 1/2- 3/4" of length from the wall but you can usually "find" that somewhere in the angles of the trap, etc. Was hoping to see the rest of the plumbing, etc. Pic. is still kind of close.
    – gnicko
    Oct 8, 2021 at 20:52

1 Answer 1

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That is interesting. Your plumber got creative. That is schedule 40 PVC and it was not meant to have a nut on it. Yet, there it is. One nut evidently firmly attached.

If I am wrong, which I highly doubt, and that nut is supposed to be there, then it will unscrew with a big pair of channel locks. I assume you already tried that.

Why was a nut used? What is holding the nut in place? What magic glue? Epoxy? Two part or single? A bucket of superglue? Old polyurethane? Heat to soften the PVC and create a perfect shape?

And now you want to know how to get it off...

If it's not leaking, then leave it on. It it is leaking, then its time to invest in a small grinder. Not that I like Dremel, but they do make the tool which will accurately cut that nut off.

PVC is harder than its glue is strong and slotting the outside so that a screwdriver can be used to pry the PVC off will usually take a joint apart.

Whenever I do plumbing, before I begin, I always assure the customer that plumbing is the 'surprise' trade. I never know what I am going to find, and I never know what is going to happen.

Good Luck.

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  • Thanks for your reply, so what connector should I use to replace that nut?
    – Brian Z
    Oct 8, 2021 at 3:58
  • Good catch on that actually being Sch40 pipe. The ideal solution, as mentioned in a comment, is to just cut this monstrosity out and replace it with a proper trap kit. It will make life much easier
    – FreeMan
    Oct 8, 2021 at 12:26
  • Just uploaded the pic. So, cut from the end of the pipe, and replace a whole trap kit. was trying to remove the Charlotte pipe from the end pipe, but it's very tight.
    – Brian Z
    Oct 8, 2021 at 13:51
  • All the pvc glue I have used actually reacts with the pvc pipe and bonds it - prying apart is virtually impossible without severe damage. Unless you used the wrong glue.
    – Solar Mike
    Oct 8, 2021 at 18:43
  • Props to the plumber that got a freakin street elbow to mate with finish plumbing. That nut doesn't need to come off; it goes in the garbage still attached to the elbow. Need a slip-joint PVC Sewer Drain Adapter, an entire trap kit, and that elbow gone.
    – Mazura
    Oct 8, 2021 at 20:19

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