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I have some piers under my patio deck. What kind of pier is it?

Are there concrete footings underneath these green poles? I am remaking my deck, and would like to add some more of these. I can't see what's underneath, and have no idea how to remake one. My guess is that there are concrete cylinders underground that the green metal poles are cast into. This is my first experience with deck, so I have no idea. If anybody could point the general direction to me what are these piers called, what are the dimensions of the concrete footings underneath and how to construct one that would be awesome.

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    Those appear to be the tops of screw piles. If so, no concrete footing, and to get more you hire a firm that screws new ones in where you want them (using a very serious hydraulic screwdriver.)
    – Ecnerwal
    Sep 26, 2021 at 2:58
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    Do note that (unless your local building codes say otherwise), there is no particular reason to use a screw pile to support your deck over a standard concrete footer. The depth of the footer (or pile) will depend on your local frost line (and is noted in your local building codes), and the diameter of the concrete footings will be determined by code and the size post sitting on top of them. Since we don't know where in the world you are, we cannot speak to your local building codes.
    – FreeMan
    Oct 26, 2021 at 13:50
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    Well, one reason for their popularity is that they can be installed this morning and built on this afternoon, which is not the case for concrete footings/piers. No excavation, forming, getting a concrete truck to the location, (or mixing it yourself) backfilling or waiting to cure.
    – Ecnerwal
    Oct 26, 2021 at 13:53

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The green sleeve appears to point specifically to "Techno Metal Post" per a brief search.

Picture of 3 green sleeved screw piles and the associacted driving equipment

That's a specific brand of screw-pile or helical-pile. You can see the ground-screw parts on the bottoms of them in the picture above.

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