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I have a self-tapping screw that has stripped through its plastic (I can't be more specific) housing. What's the toughest (as in resistant to stripping, it's not particularly load bearing) glue that I can fill it with, and still be able to drive it in once set? (I do need to be able to remove it again.)

For example, a two-part epoxy would be nice and strong, but it wouldn't tap. A 'hot melt' stick would be easy, but I'm not convinced it would hold well; likewise a silicone sealant or caulking. A PVA wood glue should be possible to screw into, but I think it might just start to crumble rather than hold a thread? Perhaps 'Gorilla Glue'?

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    A good way to be "more specific" is to post a picture. If we can see the screw and the hole it came out of this will help us understand the situation.
    – tnknepp
    Aug 27, 2021 at 18:35
  • It might help to include a picture of the part with the stripped hole, as well as indicating the type of plastic. Different plastics can require different techniques.
    – FreeMan
    Aug 27, 2021 at 18:35
  • @tnknepp jinx! :)
    – FreeMan
    Aug 27, 2021 at 18:35
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    Use a an epoxy compatible with the plastic, then once it's set drill a hole slightly smaller than the shaft of the screw.
    – brhans
    Aug 28, 2021 at 1:47

2 Answers 2

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I would drill out the plastic and glue in a plastic rod of a suitable diameter then re-drill the hole as necessary.

This does of course depend on the thickness of the material that is being worked with.

Another option is to glue a fresh piece of plastic behind to give more support to the screw.

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  • Yes, unfortunately it's very small, and no (convenient) access behind. I jumped to glue thinking that would be an easy way of filling it with plastic, just formed in situ.
    – OJFord
    Aug 27, 2021 at 18:53
  • To be honest if I had room to do this without splitting the plastic that remains I'd just set a nut or threaded insert in there.
    – OJFord
    Aug 27, 2021 at 19:58
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Use the two part epoxy and drill a pilot hole for the self-tapper to get started in. Take care to only drill through the material, as there may be something beneath that doesn't like being drilled at the same time.

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