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I would like to install a mount point on the ceiling for my wife so that she can continue doing aerial work. This is the mount point I want to install:

Stainless Steel Mounting Point with Expansion Bolts Aerials USA Stainless Steel Mount Point

As you can see, the equipment comes with expansion bolts. I HAVE NOT identified a joist in the ceiling (edited: I was wrong, see below) that is large enough to support these bolts, but to me, it seems counter-intuitive to remove material from the joist (drilling holes) for the expansion bolts and then putting the jackets in and bolting the flange in place. I understand the mechanism of action (I think), but I feel as though a longer lag screw with a small diameter pilot bore is going to have more surface area to hold onto, and therefore have more purchase overall and therefore a stronger hold on the joist itself. I could be completely wrong about this, though, which is why I'm here :-)

STUPIDITY EDIT: I had sworn that I had seen in the attic the joists in the ceiling. I was wrong. I went into the attic to take pictures for you, and I could not get a clear picture of them because they are obscured by insulation. So my brain was creating images that did not exist. I apologize.

To be clear about the forces involved: the activity in question is commonly known as "aerial lyra", with a semi-rigid hoop a bit under three feet in diameter, suspended by a doubled-up rope from a heavy carabiner clipped to the ring shown above. The hoop will be swinging back and forth, there will be shearing forces, etc.

This is the exact object which will be suspended from the ceiling, holding a ~150 lb human.

This is what it looks like suspended. It is hard to find pictures in situ that are not in industrial settings since most of the time these are used in warehouses and lofts, not living rooms:

Aerial Lyra Example Image courtesy Xpert Pole Fitness

I feel that I am out of my depth here, and I do not want to damage my home or injure my wife. What is the safest, most durable way for me to mount this object to the joist in my ceiling?

My home was built in 1941, and is lathe and plaster construction. There is no drywall in the ceiling.

Edit: Sorry, I should have been putting info here and not in comments. Apologies.

Can you add a picture of the ceiling in question? I will get a picture of the ceiling and the joist in the attic.

Expansion bolts are used in cement/concrete surfaces. That's what I thought. Thank you for verifying that.

I would be very uncomfortable putting this on one ceiling joist, I think the strain etc from the movement will cause the joist to move and the drywall to fracture. Consider spanning several joists. Yeah, I was thinking this from the beginning, i.e. a plank firmly fastened between two joists with the swivel bolted in the middle.

The problem is that ceilings are not designed to support weight like this. To make this work SAFELY, you really need to consult a licensed and qualified architect or engineer to design the proper support structure for this load. In the end, that may be what I need to do if I don't want anyone to get hurt.

Is there another floor above the room you're planning to install this in, or is the roof above this room? No, this is a single story home with a ~30cm crawlspace below and a very small attic space above.

Thank you everyone for your input. I'll go get the pictures requested.

Second edit: Here's some pictures of the ceiling.

My ceiling from the perspective of the door Here's the ceiling looking in from the doorway.

My ceiling from the other direction Here's the ceiling from the other direction, from behind the archway that you can see on the far side in the previous picture.

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  • Can you add a picture of the ceiling in question? Or at least, can you see the joists in the ceiling?
    – Machavity
    Jul 28 at 16:49
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    Expansion bolts are used in cement/concrete surfaces. You do not want to use plaster or drywall alone, to hold this. Lag bolts are best if you have enough wood thickest(thinking a double joust for all screws).
    – crip659
    Jul 28 at 16:53
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    I would be very uncomfortable putting this on one ceiling joist, I think the strain etc from the movement will cause the joist to move and the drywall to fracture. Consider spanning several joists.
    – Gil
    Jul 28 at 19:29
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    The problem is that ceilings are not designed to support weight like this. To make this work SAFELY, you really need to consult a licensed and qualified architect or engineer to design the proper support structure for this load.
    – jwh20
    Jul 28 at 20:05
  • Is there another floor above the room you're planning to install this in, or is the roof above this room?
    – brhans
    Jul 28 at 23:11
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Outdoor swing sets deal with similar loads, and have a single 2x8 or 4x4 beam spanning 10 or 12 feet.

Accounting for many times the dynamic load of a swing set, you could attach a 2x8 across several ceiling joists (6..8 or as many as practical) , which are all likely spaced 16in apart, using 5in lag screws, 2 per joist, and attach the swivel to the 2x8 using lag bolts (not expansion bolts).

Alternatively, you could build a swing set frame tall enough to have legs on the ground and its beam also secured to the ceiling. This would provide rigid stability and transfer the load to the ground.

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    I prefer this answer (inasmuch as the question warrants one). With proper connection between multiple ceiling joists this can be done safely. However, cosmetic damage to the drywall is likely.
    – isherwood
    Jul 29 at 14:38
  • While I like the 2x8 across the top of the joists idea, I’d add blocking (maybe even 2 layers of 2x material) at the bottom of the joist bay where the bolts come through the ceiling. (Prevents sawing of the drywall.) And I would use bolts — not lag screws. Loktite and nylock nuts are your friend here. Use big washers on the bolts at the top of the 2x8 that spans joists. All that said, your house structure may not lend itself to a simple solution like this, so a professional set of eyes really is the prudent course of action. Jul 30 at 20:11
  • Just to be crystal clear, when I say 'bolts', I mean real bolts -- not the expansion bolts pictured. If the holes through the bracket are smallish and you're having a hard time finding a 12" long -- 1/4" bolt, then allthread with nuts would do the job. An acorn nut on the underside would be classier than a plain nut. Loktite, loktite, loktite. Jul 31 at 2:27
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I was very surprised that there was little to no safe mounting information when I viewed the product you linked to, not even a load rating. Because of the complexity of supporting a live human load, I figured there would be a ton of CYA (cover yur arse) stuff...

However, further digging on the website led me to numerous references related to setting up equipment for what you want to do. From your supplier's website (emphasis mine):

  • always conduct thorough research and contact professionals before making any big decisions.
  • Any rigging points that you use to attach to should be checked and certified by a competent rigger or structural engineer.
  • You likely don't know the strength of what you're planning to rig from until you've consulted a structural engineer. Because of this we will always recommend you speak to a professional rigger and structural engineer.
  • This is not something that should be undertaken by anyone other than a professional after consulting with a structural engineer.
  • rigging aerial at home can be tricky and dangerous if it's not done properly. Please take our advice, do your research, contact the professionals...

Hopefully this is enough to convince you that your ceiling joists (and perhaps rafters, ridge beam, entire structure) is not designed to support a dynamic/swinging/falling live human load without proper engineering.

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