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In my home we tend to keep the windows open whenever the weather is moderate. We often have breezy or windy nights and it's common for doors to slam in the middle of the night or to bang repeatedly because of the air movement. In order to prevent this, I often have to use a door stop or something else to block it from moving. In some cases, a hook on the back of the door, or some sort of magnetic clasp might work. Door stops work but I'd rather not have to do doorstop-duty every night.

Are there any other options? I've looked around for 'soft close' hinges but I haven't found anything that really fits my requirements. I would really like something that works like a car door when you open it all the way i.e. it will stay there until you really push on it. Obviously a really strong wind could do that but I could live with that happening on rare occasions.

Is there anything like this available for standard-sized interior door hinges? Any other ideas I should consider?

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  • There used to be something to hold screen doors close. Two little rubber wheels on a pivot point. Door would push on one wheel so the second one would hold door close. Should work to hold door fully open against a wall. Would be fully automatic.
    – crip659
    Jul 6 at 21:34
  • Are these exterior doors or interior doors moving due to air pressure changes? The search terms "piston door closer" may be of interest to you. An assortment of strengths available and they can be locked in the open position. There are also door closers sold for commercial buildings fit for almost any mode of operation, including stiffly held open and closed, with or without magnets or electromagnets. I don't know the shopping terminology, but the ones I've seen were expensive and robust.
    – K H
    Jul 7 at 4:42
  • @KH These are interior doors. I recently greased the hinges because they were so squeaky and now it takes very little breeze to move them.
    – JimmyJames
    Jul 7 at 14:51
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Magnetic door holders "stay there until you really push on it." The commercial electromagnetic style have a range of holding forces from "strong" to "mount that thing on a wall stud; you'll rip it clean off if it's only mounted to the drywall!" (These are commonly used for releasing fire control doors by a fire alarm system.) Others have a more stylish appearance and probably much less holding strength. Something akin to these could be constructed from hardware store parts. (photos: www.sdcsecurity.com, Amazon)

electromagnetic door holder magnetic door holder

A reverse-action spring loaded hinge could be set up to hold open a door. Their force is much more gentle than that of a magnetic door holder. It might normally take a couple of breezes to move a door from full open to partly closed and finally slam it. The door-opening hinge could reset the door to full-open after each breeze; it would slam only in the case of a sufficiently strong and long breeze. (photo: Walmart) spring hinge

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  • The second magnetic one you show could work in a few scenarios. Do you have a link to where you found that?
    – JimmyJames
    Jul 7 at 14:55
  • @JimmyJames I found that photo at Amazon; just search (web generally or Amazon-specific) for 'magnetic door holder' and you'll find many styles.
    – Greg Hill
    Jul 7 at 15:13
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There are door closers that control the last 4-5”. That is to say, they allow the door to swing freely for opening, etc., but when closing they slow the door to a very slow swing.

The closers are expensive, but they’ll do the trick. Try Emtek.com They have a terrible website, but great customer service. Give them a call.

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  • Looked around on Emtek's site but couldn't find anything called a 'closer' or 'door closer'. They have some spring hinges which are a solution but not quite what I am looking for.
    – JimmyJames
    Jul 8 at 13:47
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These pistons are for storm doors. You can get them at a hardware store.

source

piston

On the door, these slow movement of the door because of the piston. It will close slowly and not slam.

And do you see that silver thing? I put an arrow on it. You want a piston with one of those on it. I had been around these storm door pistons for many years before I realized you could slide that thing down and lock the door open with it. That is what you want to hold your doors open.

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  • I can't imagine these installed on interior doors.
    – JimmyJames
    Jul 8 at 13:41
  • @JimmyJames - Unfashionable?
    – Willk
    Jul 8 at 22:35
  • Yeah, maybe a little.
    – JimmyJames
    Jul 9 at 13:14

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