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I am currently repairing a deck that is several years old and noticed that it does not have deck tension ties installed.

The ledger is hung on a solid brick wall (8” thick, two courses). The brick wall is the primary structure of the home (~100 years old).

The local permitting office indicated that 4 ties are required for the deck, each installed to achieve 750lbs of tension, with a tie no more than 2 feet from each end.

The wood connection is easy to find (e.g., Simpson), but I’m having trouble finding a masonry fastener that is approved for wet exterior applications and can develop the full 750lbs pull-out strength in brick.

Is there a standard or approved way to attach tension connections to solid brick?

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    I'd be surprised if that would pass inspection anyway--brick isn't usually considered structural. It's essentially siding in modern homes. You'd have to anchor through to the actual wall. Maybe revise to tell us more about your home's construction and age.
    – isherwood
    Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 15:20
  • I am not clear on why the local requires the deck be tied to the main building. Usually, the deck can be stand-alone as far as it is structurally stable. If insisted by the inspector, you should consult with a structural engineer to provide a solution. I'll look into Hilti Anchors or using thru-bolts.
    – r13
    Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 15:48
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    @r13 I think you misunderstood. I read it as the deck is currently tied (hung) on the wall, therefore, it needs lateral stabilization. Regardless though, even free-standing would likely require the ties unless it was very well cross-braced. Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 15:55
  • @DonBoitnott I knew it is attached. But, you are correct, the code now requires "positive attachment" to tie the deck to the building.
    – r13
    Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 16:10
  • @isherwood the brick is the structure of the home - I’ve revised - thank you!
    – Jay
    Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 20:22

2 Answers 2

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Based on 2015 International Building Code:

enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

See P.17 & 18 Prescriptive Residential Wood Deck Construction Guide

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  • Yes, I am familiar with those code requirements - I am looking to satisfy the condition of attaching directly to masonry. The document you linked directs “use expansion anchors or epoxy anchors when fastening to concrete or masonry” - I am looking for an appropriate anchor.
    – Jay
    Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 20:30
  • As suggested, check out proper anchors and adhesives from Hilti.com. They provide expansion anchor as well, but I doubt it would work.
    – r13
    Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 22:01
  • Simpson (Strong-Tie) has anchors for masonry works too.
    – r13
    Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 22:06
  • You can do the research to get an idea of the availability of materials. However, I still think it is the engineer's job to provide the connection details and specify the type of anchorage for your application.
    – r13
    Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 22:22
  • This is my original comment to your question that you may have missed: "I am not clear on why the local requires the deck be tied to the main building. Usually, the deck can be stand-alone as far as it is structurally stable. If insisted by the inspector, you should consult with a structural engineer to provide a solution. I'll look into Hilti Anchors or using thru-bolts. – r13 6 hours ago" (see the Comment block below the question box)
    – r13
    Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 22:37

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