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I have a 1st floor porch ceiling that is separating and rusting that I need to tear down and replace. It's a steel porch with tile floors and what I'm guessing is some sort of corrugated galvanized steel deck.

My question is once I tear down the stucco steel mesh and wire brush the rust off, what do I replace it with? What is this stucco steel mesh thing called and is it normally used for exterior work under a porch?

If I do some sort of stucco mesh sheet replacement, will it just trap water and sag again? Should I just paint the wavy steel underneath and not put a replacement up, showing unpainted ribbed steel like my neighbors? If I don't replace it with some sort of painted stucco it won't match the 2nd-floor porch above it, but I'm also worried I'll run into the same problem again. It's tile floor on top - do I need to redo or reseal the tiles? I don't notice any obvious holes or cracks in the tiles above the ceiling.

What is the recommended way to refinish it - leave it bare or use some sort of coating/paint/covering? If that's galvanized steel underneath, paint won't stick to it correct? In that case if I wirebrush the rust transfer off, I might scrape the galvanized layer off in which case I'd have to treat that area? Or maybe there is a gentler way of removing the rust residue without scraping the galvanized coating? Is it a safe guess to assume that it's galvanized deck, or is there some steel deck that's not galvanized?

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  • It is my (possibly incorrect) understanding that the corrugated steel you're seeing is basically the form into which the concrete floor is poured. It does provide long-term additional support for the concrete, as well, so maintenance is necessary. I would suggest removing whatever stucco-like covering is over it, wire-brushing it to remove the heavy rust, coating it with a rust converter which will chemically alter the iron oxide to prevent further rusting, then primer & paint for protection. This will require annual review to ensure it's not rusting further, [con't]
    – FreeMan
    May 5 at 11:57
  • and maintenance if/when it does show signs of additional rusting. I'm posting as a comment because I have enough confidence to do this on my house (if I had this situation), but not enough to truly encourage someone else to do so. Wait for further confirmation...
    – FreeMan
    May 5 at 11:58

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