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At the ceiling box where the ceiling fan/light there is: White Wire Black Wire Red Wire Ground Wire

The 2 wall switches. The Left switch powered the fan. The right switch powered the light.

I am installing a single light fixture that has Black, White, and Ground Wire.

How do I re-wire at the switches? What do I need to do to run the new light fixture off of one of the wall switches? How do I properly/safely "Cap-Off" the switch not in use?

Also both of the wall switches the black plastic housings are both cracked pretty good. What types of switches are these so I can replace? Especially the one that will be actually in use.

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  • Good on ya' for including a clear, focused pic of the wiring before you took it all apart! You'd be amazed at how many people don't bother with that... While you're waiting for an answer, take the tour so you can learn how the Q&A format here differs from the general "discussion board" format you may be used to.
    – FreeMan
    Apr 22, 2021 at 14:50
  • The switch with the red is toast cut or remove red from the switch. Remove black jumper between switches, pig tail all the blacks and use the jumper removed between the 2 switches to connect to the switch. Get a blank /switch cover plate like Jack shows in his answer. Cap the red at both the switch location and in the ceiling box. Use the black for the light and this will meet code.
    – Ed Beal
    Apr 22, 2021 at 18:14

1 Answer 1

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Lets eliminate the switch with the red wire. Remove the two black wires on the red wire switch, one from the screw terminal and one from the backstab and wire nut them together. Remove the red wire and put a wire nut on it.

Now get a new single pole single throw, standard toggle switch since you stated both switches were cracked. Remove the black wire loop from the switch screw terminal and the wire from the backstab next to it. Pigtail them with a small piece of black wire and connect it to the new switch. Remove the other black wire from the backstab at the other end of the switch and bend a shepherd's hook on the stripped wire and screw it to the other terminal on the new switch. Ground the switch with a piece of #14 wire. Now mount the switch and get a cover similar to the one shown below.

To remove the backstab wires, shove a small screwdriver into the slot by the wires and put the wire out.

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At the ceiling box, remove the red wire and wire nut it. Connect the black wire from the box to the black wire from the light fixture with a wire nut. connect the white wires together the same way. Connect the two ground wires together with a wire nut.

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  • The very first step I am a little confused of why wire nutting those two wires at all because its just bridging between the two switches with the short black wire. But my biggest concern is the 2nd step there are 2 black wires going into backstabs and 2 black wires at the screw point (one being the short bridged wire to the other switch).
    – FrankTank
    Apr 22, 2021 at 15:36
  • Added a better pic above. Thank you:-)
    – FrankTank
    Apr 22, 2021 at 15:48
  • The feed comes into the box and loops around the first switch to feed it and then goes to the second switch to feed it. Now both switches are hot. The wires going into the backstabs are tied to the hot screw terminals so they are now hot too and they go to other lights, outlets in the room/house. You can pigtail them all together and connect a wire to the switch. I was just trying to make it simple and leave it so you could add a switch back in the future in so desired.
    – JACK
    Apr 22, 2021 at 16:43
  • I missed the backstabbed hot black on the first switch. Your new picture clarified it and I edited my answer.The important thing to remember is that the three black wires from the bottom of those switches need to be connected together with an addition piece of wire going to the switch
    – JACK
    Apr 22, 2021 at 16:54
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    I did not see that but I guess it’s never a bad idea for a new switch since today’s switches have contacts that arc on make and break.
    – Ed Beal
    Apr 22, 2021 at 19:39

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