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I'm converting a larger closet into a sauna. Cedar is the most commonly used wood for saunas due to longevity. Something like pine wouldn't last as long from what I've read.

Shouldn't the furring strips also be cedar? I see folks using pine furring strips.

The sauna is going to be 180 degrees+ and the vapor barrier would be UNDER the furring strips, thus the pine furring strips would be exposed to high temps and potentially a little moisture, which I assume would age them faster.

Shouldn't the goal for wood longevity also extend to the furring strips?

If not, why not and how long would pine furring strip last under those conditions?

Wall makeup: From the interior to the exterior:

  1. Cedar T&G
  2. Furring strips, which the cedar attaches to
  3. Aluminum and/or radiant vapor barrier
  4. Insulation
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Shouldn't the goal for wood longevity also extend to the furring strips?

I say Yes.

Rip some furring strips from the T&G and your golden.

If not, why not and how long would pine furring strip last under those conditions?

Unanswerable, But negated by my answer to - Shouldn't the goal for wood longevity also extend to the furring strips?

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  • 👍 Good enough for me! It just seemed like an odd inconsistency that I've now seen a number of times via online content. I thought I might be missing something. – Mark Witmer Mar 29 at 23:39

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