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If the apex of the lean-to roof extends beyond the tall wall 6 to 12 inches, what does the topmost course of cedar shingles look like, up at the highest point on the roof?

Is there flashing that partly covers that course and then bends around to wrap the decking and then turns downward 90-degrees to act as a drip-edge?

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Your roof edge may have different details, but the concept is the same - drip edge is required to prevent water damages.

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Drip edges are metal sheets, usually shaped like an “L,” installed at the edge of the roof. Also called drip edge flashing or D-metal, they serve a vital function by directing water away from the fascia and into the gutter. Without a drip edge, water may end up beneath the shingles and may cause damage to various parts of the home. Though your home may not have originally had a drip edge installed, drip edges are now required by most building codes across North America to protect homes from damage.

https://www.iko.com/na/pro/building-professional-tools/learn-about-roofing/guide-to-drip-edges-for-shingle-roofs/

For the ridge:

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  • Sorry, I should have the question clearer. I'm asking about the very topmost course of shingles at the highest point on the roof, not the first course down near the eave. – mr blint Mar 28 at 23:10
  • Fine. There should be a L shaped flashing from the lean-to wall to the first course of the shingle. If I see some picture, I will post it here. – r13 Mar 28 at 23:15
  • See the bottom most picture just added. – r13 Mar 28 at 23:20

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