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I'm looking to do the floor in out new house, we love the herringbone design but the specific planks are quite expensive.

I'm wondering if I can achieve a herringbone style by just following the pattern with regular laminate planks?

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    Each maker has their own tongue and groove system. I can not see how you will be able to get all the tongue's and groove to snap together end to side and side to end. Maybe, but it sounds like and exercise in frustration.
    – Alaska Man
    Feb 24 at 22:03
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    I did it once with pergo the old style that was T&G I used a router table to make the grooves and they sold the premade tongue that glued in on both sides, the owner wanted another room and I told her the names of some contractors that might take the job but it was a major pain in the butt. I will do it with tile any day but never again with T&G.
    – Ed Beal
    Feb 24 at 22:12
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    It can't be done with typical laminates. With modern laminate you assemble an entire row, end-to-end, then you attach that row to the previous. It must be done in two movements. With herringbone you'd have to do both at once, which isn't possible.
    – isherwood
    Feb 24 at 22:37
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    You'd also probably void the warranty.
    – isherwood
    Feb 24 at 22:38
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The ratio of length to width needs to be exact to make a herringbone pattern work. The width needs to be an exact multiple of the length. You can check this by laying a row of planks next to a lengthwise plank. Then you can decide if you think it will work by cutting the length of the plank to match.

If this is a floating laminate you'll need to cut off some of the interlocking lip of each laminate plank and figure out if the planks will hold together still. You'll probably be outside of the overlap spec of the manufacturer so warranty will be void. This is very much an advanced layout and your floor needs to be dead flat to have any chance of this working well. Picking a glue down plank will likely yield better results

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  • "If this is a floating laminate you'll need to cut off some of the interlocking lip of each laminate plank and figure out if the planks will hold together still." If they are not interlocked then they will not hold together.
    – Alaska Man
    Feb 24 at 22:10

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