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I need to bring in a new 220v circuit to my basement. Once the conduit enters the basement does it need to immediately enter a box like this diagram or can I just continue the wire to outlet box 20’ away.

enter image description here

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    Is this a service wire (first off the meter), a feeder (going to a subpanel), or a simple circuit like for an EVSE or welder or receptacle? – Harper - Reinstate Monica Feb 24 at 6:41
  • Just an outlet for a dryer. – Tony Smith Feb 24 at 12:40
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The box is only required if you're making a connection just inside the wall. For example, you're pulling THHN/THWN wires through the conduit, but you want to run NM-B cable through the walls. In that case the junction between the cables must be in a junction box. If you're continuing with THHN in conduit (through your walls or surface mounted), and you have a continuous run there's no requirement for the box at all. Note that if you've hit the end of your spool of wire and need to join to a new spool, you'll need to make that connection in a JB, no matter what.

If you're simply changing direction, a box, another LB or even a sweep (if there's room in the wall) could be used. As a matter of fact, the short stub of EMT coming out of the LB in the picture could be replaced with a sweep elbow that immediately turns the wire in the direction you need to go. It may not be the easiest pull, but with the LB right there, it shouldn't be difficult.

Disclaimer: I'm not an electrician. This is based off of knowledge gleaned from reading and applying common sense, not an in-depth knowledge of the NEC.

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    @TonySmith A) I appreciate the check-mark, but I'd wait a bit longer. Make sure that none of the electricians here see any errors in what I've said - that's based mostly on my reading of other answer and some common sense, not an in depth knowledge of code (shoulda put that disclaimer in my answer.). B) Nope, can't do that - you cannot (I know this one for certain!) strip the sheath off cables to pull through conduit. They're neither properly insulated nor are they properly marked for that purpose. – FreeMan Feb 24 at 12:52
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    Well, OK, you can, technically do it, but it doesn't meet code and is illegal . If discovered after a fire (or other insurance claim), your insurance company could use it as an excuse to not pay the claim. – FreeMan Feb 24 at 12:55
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    No need for an "ugly access panel". If you use a standard duplex box, a blank cover plate will fit just fine. You can paint/wallpaper it so it's visually less obvious if you desire, it just needs to have the screws visible and easily accessible. You can pull cable through conduit, but it's A) harder to do, and B) requires larger conduit since the conduit must be sized off the wide dimension of the cable, not the flat dimension. If you search this site, you'll find lots of places where the minimum conduit size is spelled out for you. – FreeMan Feb 24 at 13:31
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    I guess I could always hang a nice picture over it or something. Lol. Thank you sir. – Tony Smith Feb 24 at 15:29
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    Or for that matter, if the box is large enough for the 2 extra wires, you can put a receptacle there. The recep can't be on the dryer circuit, you'd need to pull 2 more wires to supply it. (presuming all-metal EMT/Rigid back to the panel is serving as ground). – Harper - Reinstate Monica Feb 24 at 20:17
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If it's a kind of wire that needs conduit you could continue the conduit in EMT for the 20' to the outlet location. (replace the box immediately inside the wall with another LB body.)

If you want to transition to romex for the 20' to the outlet you'll need to use a box instead.

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