0

I have this valve under my sink that is meant for a dishwasher, but it has a weird size to the outlet and its old, and I want to replace it. The two lines above this one lead into the sink (hot/cold)

A few specific questions:

  1. Is the water supply line going into it a PEX supply line or pvc? I'm not sure how to tell.
  2. Is what is there currently there compression with a ferrule? What can I expect to see when I remove it?
  3. Can I, should I, reuse the ferrule (if that's what is under this old one)? If not what is the safe way to remove it without damaging the pipe?
  4. What should I do if I reach some point of no return and can't attach a valve? I don't want to leave my house's water off forever, and because of covid calling a plumber CAN happen but I want to try and prevent that. Can I cap it off temporarily if something goes wrong?
  5. Is there a specific type of valve I should get? I know quarter turn are preferred. I also don't want to get the wrong kind of connection for this kind of supply line

enter image description here

enter image description here

Edit: I realize I have another question about this same valve, but that question was "what kind of outlet fitting can I get" and the answer was "you probably can't get it, so replace it". This question is about replacing it without making a mess of things, because its hard to tell what kind of pipe is there (appears to be painted copper)

3
  • This is a duplicate of your last question there are multiple answers there.
    – Ed Beal
    Feb 10 at 19:29
  • 1
    Does this answer your question? Size of outlet on my hot water valve for dishwasher supply
    – tnknepp
    Feb 10 at 19:48
  • I asked this separately because I wasn't sure when I made the first one if a new valve was required. I think it probably is, so I wanted to get more details about what to do so I don't mess it all up
    – shayl
    Feb 10 at 19:55
0

Is the water supply line going into it a PEX supply line or pvc? I'm not sure how to tell.

It is painted copper, a compression fitting is used on copper, not pex or pvc. Scrape it with a screwdriver or utility knife to reveal the copper.

Is what is there currently there compression with a ferrule? What can I expect to see when I remove it?

Yes. You can take the valve off by using two wrenches, one one the body of the valve and the other on the nut. Once the valve is off You will see that the ferrule and the nut will be left on the pipe.

Can I (should I) reuse the ferrule (if that's what is under this old one)? If not what is the safe way to remove it without damaging the pipe?

NO, Ferrule's can not be re-used. They are crimped onto the pipe when the nut is tightened and will have to be cut off by cutting off the end of the pipe, then the nut will slide off.

What should I do if I reach some point of no return and can't attach a valve? I don't want to leave my house's water off forever, and because of covid calling a plumber CAN happen but I want to try and prevent that. Can I cap it off temporarily if something goes wrong?

Have a back plan, I.E. a different type valve. It looks like you have just enough room to install another compression valve or a solder on valve. If those fail, having a push to connect (sharkbite is one brand) valve as a back up could save your bacon.

is there a specific type of valve I should get? I know quarter turn are preferred. I also don't want to get the wrong kind of connection for this kind of supply line

See the answer to the previous question. Yes it should be a quarter turn valve.

Replace all of the valves while you are at it.

2
  • Thank you, appreciate the advice about the backup plan. That's the main reason I was looking for alternatives before, but it looks like replacing it is going to be the thing to do.
    – shayl
    Feb 10 at 20:02
  • Ferrules can be used more than ince as long as they were tightened properly originally and not gorillered up, even then a few turns of ptfe and they seal.
    – Solar Mike
    Feb 10 at 21:10
0

I can't say I have seen those before. Does it looked like they are glued on? Then it would be PCV or CPVC (if its hot water). You could try going to home depot (yes, they can help) during the day when the best plumbing associate will be there. Also you could try a plumbing supply store.

Have you heard of the SharkBite system? Those may help you out. You can get a valve that will slide onto to the pipe if you can get the old one off. Also, you can get cap that will slide on. I recommend buying the sharkbite removal tool if you put on a cap and want to take it off.

2
  • I don't think its glued on, it seems to be a compression nut. It's probably painted copper like the other answer said. I'm going to root around under there to be sure, I didn't even realize painted copper was a thing!
    – shayl
    Feb 10 at 19:59
  • It looks like pex pipe to me, which can accept compression fittings. It has a familiar black icon on it that pex pipe has. It is not pvc, as that is not used with potable water and probably wouldn't fit with one of these valves.
    – DAS
    Feb 11 at 4:46
0

That is certainly a compression fitting. Most are these days for sinks and toilets.

You know what you get...

NOTHING

You need to get into good DIY habits...

Easy Rule - you do not replace or touch good working plumbing unless there is a bigger project justifying it.

You don't like this valve? What? It's under your sink. It works. Why are you wasting your time and others thinking about this? This isn't meant to be mean, but you need someone that will be honest. You do not "fix" things that work. So for your time and effort, the reward is you introducing risk on your home - either defective product or install.

5
  • I generally agree, but I believe OP needs to replace the pipe that connects to this valve, and he was told in his other question that it has an obsolete fitting and he should replace the valve.
    – izzy
    Feb 10 at 22:22
  • @izzy - he just needs an adapter for hose or a hose with different fittings. These are readily available.
    – DMoore
    Feb 10 at 22:24
  • @izzy - also this size used to be normal and they would actually give the adapter for this size with some toilets and faucets to connect to.
    – DMoore
    Feb 10 at 22:37
  • I think its an old valve. I'm still trying to find the one I need but I've had multiple people (both on stack exchange and plumbing store) tell me this is an old valve and it is hard to find this size). A normal 3/8" compression fitting for a supply hose will not go over this valve's outlet. Right now this valve isn't useful to me because I can't hook my modern dishwasher hose to it, and I can't seem to find an adapter that fits. If you can point me in a direction to one that DOES fit I will be thrilled because I really don't want to replace this valve if I don't have to
    – shayl
    Feb 10 at 23:17
  • Just get an adapter and screw it in.
    – DMoore
    Feb 11 at 5:02

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.