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I'd like to mount three hooks to the wall to enable TRX work and band work. One high (TRX, full weight), one middle (band work, light weight), one bottom (heavy stretching bands, medium weight). I weigh 200lbs so assume max pullout force is 300lbs.

The section of the wall that I need to mount the hooks is between a corner and a doorframe, and does not have any studs, metal or wood. There is a metal corner bracket shaping the drywall (standard). Photo is at the bottom of this post.

My thinking is to buy a sturdy sheet of 1/2 ply, cut it to width, and attach it with multiple snaptoggle anchors. Despite this distributing the weight, I've never relied on only drywall for this type of force.

Any thoughts on how realistic this is and suggestions on other approaches?

Photo of section of wall

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    I haven’t seen a door or a corner without frame work. I would check your method of identifying studs without them there is nothing to hold the 300 lbs of force in place.
    – Ed Beal
    Feb 9, 2021 at 23:00
  • If there are no studs, I'd like to know what door frames are attached to. Doing a reno and installing doors myself.
    – anm767
    Feb 9, 2021 at 23:47

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Find and use studs for this. Dynamic human weight ... moving, vibrating, 200 pounds in motion being pulled to a stop by the wall. Drywall anchors are not designed for that, nor is drywall. You want 3-inch lag bolts centered carefully on wood studs or toggle bolts through metal studs and ideally multiple ones for redundancy.

Also I agree with the comment above ... roughly a zero percent chance that you don't have a stud at the door frame and in the corner. How do you know you don't? And if it's true, and you do what you said with the plywood etc, you'll just snap off the whole sheet of drywall when you hang from it because there is nothing holding it up other than a corner bead and its own rigidity.

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  • Noted, and you all were right. There are studs, my detection method was flawed and I ran a screw in the middle of the drywall to check, where there is no stud. The studs are on the sides.
    – user146969
    Feb 10, 2021 at 12:31
  • @user146969 studs are usually spaced 16 inches apart. A random spot in the "middle" of a wall has less than a 1-in-58 chance (1/4" screw - being generous on screw size, 14.5" empty space between studs) of hitting a stud. As you've noted, a very flawed method of finding studs.
    – FreeMan
    Feb 10, 2021 at 14:28
  • @FreeMan you want to talk about the time I tried hanging something from my MIL's condo ceiling and discovered, after MUCH frustrating experimentation, that the place has 19.2" engineered joists covered by a double layer of 5/8" sheetrock? At the time I had never heard of such construction so I didn't even know what I was looking for. Not a fun day. And you can't hang anything heavy from those joists anyway, you have to open the ceiling and build it out. :(
    – jay613
    Feb 10, 2021 at 15:41

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