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My sink is leaking and I’m sure it’s from the lock nut (I’ve put an arrow on the pic at where the water seems to be coming from).

Can anyone guide me on how to fix it? (Preferably by replacing the leaking part, I don’t want to just seal the leak and have to repair it at a later time.)

Thank you!

enter image description here

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    Plumber's putty goes under the flange of the strainer where it sits on top of the sink. Not between the nut and the sink. That should be a gasket or nothing. Step one, pull the strainer. Steps next, all of them for putting a strainer in, which these days come with gaskets for underneath; still also need plumber's putty if it doesn't come w/ one for the top (sometimes even if).
    – Mazura
    Feb 6 '21 at 22:46
  • thank you! i’m going to a diy shop tomorrow to buy some plumbers putty and a new strainer!
    – daklutzz
    Feb 7 '21 at 0:10
  • ...And quickly feel the underside of the sink at the back to make sure the water isn't coming from elsewhere. Feb 7 '21 at 6:33
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If tightening the nut 1/8-1/4 turns at a time doesn't stop the leak than the nut should be removed. The drain also should be removed and the flange piece (that sits in the sink) needs to be cleaned.

Apply fresh plumber's putty to the underside of the flange. Place it back in the basin and press down until putty oozes out.

Place the rubber washer and than the nut back on to the threaded drain piece. Snug it up by hand and than tighten with a wrench until the pipe can't be turned by hand.

Clean the putty from the flange and fill the basin with water. Open the drain and look for leaks. Tighten in small increments if leaks are noted and continue running water until no leaks are found.

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  • thank you! i’m going to a diy shop tomorrow to buy some plumbers putty and a new strainer!
    – daklutzz
    Feb 7 '21 at 0:10
  • Refinement to the above answer: DONT PRESS the strainer back into the putty. Pull it down from below, make all of the connections and only once you're finished do you clean off extra putty. This permits putty to move to where it needs to go as you jostle the strainer and pipe from below. I may not be explaining this correctly (it is late) and some may not like my answer but I think this is an improved way of doing things. Of course, ultimately the strainer is pulled tight and excess putty is removed.
    – DAS
    Feb 7 '21 at 8:12
  • thank you! i’ll make sure to pull down, and not push from the top. :)
    – daklutzz
    Feb 7 '21 at 9:44

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