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My husband has been fixing an older toilet in our house - it was leaking so we completely replaced all the seals on the tank and then we replaced some of the seals inside it - this is all working fine but as part of it, we got a new flush valve and chain, which came with a curly v-shaped piece of wire and we can't figure out how to actually attach the chain with the wire.

Here's an overview of the inside of our tank:
Photo of the inside of toilet tank. A hand is holding the end of a ball and rod style chain.

And here's the little v-shaped thing:

A close-up of a v-shaped wire for connecting the chain to the lever.

Here's the thing - I've been looking around and the best I've found is written instructions for how to connect it that mention shoving the v through the holes on the lever bar - and that part I understand - what I don't understand is how the chain connects to that without slipping off. Honestly, I think at this point what I need is an image that shows it because the written descriptions don't align with my attempts to use this connector.

On the Home Depot site, others seem confused about this as both the questions on the product page ask how to use it but the explanation is confusing to me.

The flush mechanism on the toilet handle has a bar with holes along the bar. Simply force the V shape clip through one of the holes so that the V faces down. If the old clip is still in place then on the plastic actuator, thread the chain UPWARD through the hole at the top of the plastic actuator leaving the BALL END "INSIDE" the actuator. Then thread the other end of the chain through the V shaped bracket and adjust the chain to the proper length by trial and error until the the toilet flushes properly.

This doesn't actually explain how the chain is supposed to be held by the V shaped bracket - when I run the chain through it, it seems too loose to be secure.

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  • Unrelated to your question, but that loose-hanging black pipe is supposed to point down into the overflow pipe, not be loose in the tank like that. – brhans Jan 20 at 3:24
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(caveat: I've never met this version in person...)

That appears to be intended for the "between-beads" part of the chain to slide down into the smallest part of the tip. The beads should be larger than the opening in the smallest part of the tip. Depending on maufacturing tolerances, it may take some force to get the chain in there, or it may not. If loose, the chain should stay put by gravity, as both sides of the chain should hang down. If you have to force it in, then it should stay put until pulled out.

If the beads are smaller than the narrowest part of the slot, I might be wrong.

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