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I installed this turbine vent but noticed that small animals like rats, small birds or even small squirrels can get through the rotor gills when it is not spinning.

I was thinking of putting a metal screen (how about wire lathe or stucco netting?) from inside the attic so that, even if an animal does get in through the rotor gills, it can't get in the attic. The rotor can be easily taken off to remove animal carcasses if they don't find their way out of the enclosure and die trapped.

Is this a good approach to pest proofing?

I am also curious why the manufacturer didn't include it.

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I would staple up some Wire soffit screen to the underside of the roof decking. No screwing thru the roof membrane required.

It unlikely the critter will die in there, if they can not pass thru then they will exit the same way the got in if they get hungry enough.

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  • Nice hands, Alaska! :)
    – FreeMan
    Jan 19 at 18:37
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Use hardware cloth with 1/2 inch openings. It is stiff enough that it can hold whatever shape you conform it to. Granted, yo'd have to configure a big enough shape to allow the turbine to spin.

It might be possible to attach pieces to the blades so as to cover the gap between them. This may take quiet a lot of effort and pop rivets.

covering the rough opening in the sheathing is the simplest solution. I have turbines on my roof set up like that and have yet to find an animal carcass in the turbine.

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  • I would use construction cloth also on the inside it’s cheap critters won’t be able to chew through it and you won’t have to run up to the roof and cover it every time it quits spinning.
    – Ed Beal
    Jan 18 at 23:47
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They make turbine vent covers that block the vent on the outside so you don't have to deal with dead animals.

There's solid ones (I guess you could build a little base frame if you want a solid one and it's not tall enough):

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Various heights exist if you hunt around:

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If none of those fit you can purchase wire mesh and just build it into an appropriately sized box yourself. Wire mesh panels are fairly easy to attach together; there's a lot of options but if you have no special tools some short bolts + washers bigger than the holes will do the job just fine. You can cut heavy mesh with cheap tin snips, or a grinder if you have one. You can fold it on the edge of a table with some thick gloves and a hammer or a piece of scrap wood, or your foot. This stuff for example is regularly sold at big box hardware stores:

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If your situation is more complex, you can call local wildlife control and they can evaluate the whole setup and give you control options.

As for screens on the inside I can't think of a problem with that except having to clear out dead animals, which might get kind of gross if you forget to regularly check, or kind of tricky (or potentially dangerous) if you see them while they're still alive.

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    the first two won't fit over the turbine rotor and the third one blocks air entirely
    – amphibient
    Jan 17 at 22:53
  • @amphibient You can also buy wire mesh and fashion it into a box that fits; it would be a fairly straightforward project. I know big box stores for example regularly sell e.g. imgur.com/howUxxS
    – Jason C
    Jan 17 at 23:00
  • I looked at the link and laughed the cover you would need to put on every time it stopped... expanded steel or construction cloth would be easy to install (construction cloth easier) and this is what many foundation and soffit vents are covered with.
    – Ed Beal
    Jan 18 at 23:45
  • @ed sorry I don't understand. Enclosing roof vents in wire mesh boxes is super common practice, it's kind of just... how it's done. For external screens that is.
    – Jason C
    Jan 19 at 14:27
  • I have not seen that in my area except winter as the complete cover was on the link the op said a method to prevent the issue when not spinning “construction cloth” is what I have seen and used but some do fully cover them in winter, I was laughing as that would not work other than that.
    – Ed Beal
    Jan 19 at 16:40

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