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I'm wondering if anyone can help me id some rough plumbing. This is a basement bathroom rough in a 2009 New Hampshire house. I believe it was supposed to be roughed in for a toilet, single vanity and a shower. Judging by the distances from the wall and pipe sizes I'm guessing #1 is for a toilet (because it's 3 inch pipe and if the wall behind it was framed the center of the pipe would be 12 1/2 inches away), #4 is for a vanity and #5 is for a shower. #2 seems to be cover for a sewage pump. I have not found any roughed venting pipes in the ceiling so far.

What is the 3 inch pipe #3? The sewage pump cover says Zoeller 17-0276. Does it only fit Zoeller pumps or are these universal fit?

Thank you in advance for looking at my question.

**Edit 1 I did some homework and snaked the pipes except for #5 which i didnt want to cut as the cap is glued on and it's so short. It seems they're all connected (now drawn in red on the schematic) and going to the sewage pump pit. I can see #1 is a toilet rough in after taking the silver wrap off.

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  • The ejector pit is usually not in the bathroom so I would expect a wall, which means #2 and #3 would not be in the bathroom. #3 may be for a floor drain or laundry room sink or washing machine. Dec 31 '20 at 15:20
  • Thanks for commenting, this is a completely unfinished basement right now and I suspect you're right, the ejector pit was meant to be walled off.
    – Mrkski77
    Dec 31 '20 at 22:52
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If the basement bathroom requires a sewage pump, one of those pipes (quite possibly #3) will be the output of the sewage pump going up to the level of the house drain (which is presumably above the floor level, if a sewage pump pit was roughed in.) Pull the cover off the pit and poke a snake into the pipes...

Or if there's only one pipe into the pit, and the pump output would go out via the cover, it may be a vent pipe and cleanout access.

Lack of vent pipes above the concrete is fairly normal. The rough in is "put pipes before pouring concrete" rather than "prepare all for a bathroom that hasn't been put in for the next 11 years, and may never be" - pipes above the concrete are easier to add than those below.

Sump basins are pretty generic - make sure the pump you want to buy fits in the one you have, but that's pretty much physical size of pump and hole, not brand-specific. The part number is for exactly what it is - a sump cover. There will be a sump basin under it, with the plumbing run to it if it's in fact for a sewage pump. An alternate possibility (not knowing where your sewage or septic pipe leaves your house) is that the sump cover is covering "the other kind of sump" (drainage) and the bathroom plumbing goes directly to your septic or sewer pipe below floor level. Once again suggesting open it, take a look, poke a snake in the pipes and see where it comes out, or listen for it, anyway.

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  • Thanks for answering. There is a 3 inch drain pipe on the wall to the left of the pump (looking at the picture), I now marked it on the diagram with a dotted line. The main soil stack is 25-30ft away so I'm pretty sure I need to tie the sewage into this pipe on the wall as you suggested. In any case, I will pop the cover off and report my findings. Thanks again.
    – Mrkski77
    Dec 31 '20 at 22:57
  • I did the snaking and all the pipes, including the 3 inch #3 connect together (now red on the diagram) and then go to the pump pit (only one pipe enters). You mentioned this means the output would go through the cover. Still not sure what #3 is for then. And now I have a follow up question, would the output of the sump pit need to go up 8.5 feet to the 3 inch drain pipe above the pit or would I run a new pipe lower on the wall to the soil stack 48ft away (tracing the walls - I added photos of these options). Thanks.
    – Mrkski77
    Jan 2 at 8:16
  • Well, that's just odd given that your pipe 48 feet away goes into the floor not out the side of the wall - so why in [expletive] didn't they just put in 50 feet of 4" pipe under the concrete instead of an [expletive] ejector pit?
    – Ecnerwal
    Jan 2 at 12:52
  • Pipe-wise you could do either, unless the present DFUs on the 3" pipe suggest that the new bathroom group should not join until the increase to 4" pipe before it goes into the slab.
    – Ecnerwal
    Jan 2 at 12:59
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You don't give a close up for #1 so I'm not sure what it is. If I were to guess #3 is the toilet, and #5 is the tub/shower with #4 being the vent for the shower drain (it could also be used as a "wet vent" and be the sink drain.) They expect you to build out a wall off the basement wall to allow for insulation, which is why those pipes are so far away from the wall.

#1 may be a below slab vent for a future radon system.

The pit and #1 are expected to be outside the boundaries of the bathroom, another wall would be build behind the toilet separating it from the ejector pit and #1. As you enter the door (on the bottom between #3 and the future wall) the bathtub would be on you right, the toilet on your left and the sink on the left near the far wall). The ejector pit will need a macerating pump and lines run to vent and the main sewer.

Ultimately the best best is pay a plumber for an hour of time with a camera snake and a tracer. It will let you figure out exactly what the original plan was.r

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  • Thanks for commenting! I added a close up for #1. The only reason I thought #1 is the toilet it's because it's a 3 inch pipe and 12.5 inches from the wall if 2x4 framing and 1/2 inch drywall were to be added (16 1/2 - 4). There is a radon pipe on the other side of the basement, already in use with a radon pump on it, maybe 25 feet away. Is it possible to have multiple radon pipes?
    – Mrkski77
    Dec 31 '20 at 23:01
  • I think you are right, #1 is probably the toilet, since under that foil tape looks to be a toilet flange.
    – mfarver
    Jan 2 at 3:23

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