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Hello and apologies for this newbie question.

I have a three way switch that controls recessed lights in an extension through a wall, one three way switch inside (basement) one three way switch outside (extension).

Outside (in the extension) I have a two gang box where the power source comes in and provides the power to the common and then the travellers for the three way switch inside (diagram explains it best): my current three way switch

What I'd like to do is to add a separate single pole switch together with the first three way in the attached diagram, that controls a separate set of recessed lights daisy chained with 2 wire Romex.

I've seen it done where the layout is three way switch to three way and then lights but this is slightly different.

For the life of me I can't figure out how to have my hot and neutral available to the single pole switch to control the second set of lights independently.

Again, sorry if this is too basic. Appreciate any help and guidance.

Edited: Adding a bit of context:

Current three way switch installation

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    Can you post photos of the insides of the boxes involved please? – ThreePhaseEel Dec 28 '20 at 2:48
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    Pics of theoretical "this is how it should be done" are nice, but pics of how it's actually done at your house are best. Common & uncommon mistakes and shortcuts can be identified and the proper workaround for your situation can be devised. Please just edit your post and post the pics, just like you did for the one above - you don't even have to upload them somewhere, the site will host them for you! – FreeMan Dec 28 '20 at 14:20
  • You're not missing a thing. You are observing correctly that hot and neutral cannot be found anywhere in a 3-way system. (except where power enters, of course). – Harper - Reinstate Monica Dec 29 '20 at 3:13
  • Hey guys, my apologies for not providing better context. The attached diagram should paint a clearer picture (I hope). – emidesigns Dec 29 '20 at 15:27
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It is simple and straightforward in this case. From the switch on the left take the hot neutral and ground to the new switch location. Then feed the hot (black) to the switch.

Now take the black to the other side of the switch with the neutral and ground to the new light location.

Install the switch and the black at the light will be the switched hot from the new switch you added.

This is the only location you can add with the diagram you referenced. If the hot and neutral are at the light, not the switched position, it will take 12-3 or 14-3 wire to do it, but it can not be done from the switch on the right.

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Perhaps I'm not understanding you because this seems to simple. The first three way switch box has the hot neutral and ground coming into it as your diagram shows (power source). That's everything you need. Just use that for your new switch you want to install. Am I missing something?

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  • Hey, thank you for getting back. I thought it would be straight forward as well but for some reason when I connected the light run and the single pole switch it tripped the breaker. I think I may be overlooking something basic. I added some photos for better context. Thank you for your time. – emidesigns Dec 29 '20 at 15:37
  • If what you call the power source is truly the power source and always has a hot wire that is not controlled by any switches, just pig tail the power source hot wire (black) to your single pole switch. Do the same with ground. Pig tail the neutral wire (white) directly to the neutral wire of the new 14/2 run of wire you installed that goes to your new lighting. Finally connect the black wire of the new 14/2 run of wire you installed that goes to your new lighting to your single pole switch. It's that simple – PennyPincherWannaBeHandyMan Dec 30 '20 at 16:39
  • This suggestion worked. I'm now trying to figure the proper grounding for the 14/3 and the two 14/2 (light runs). Are those ok to be attached to the ground on the metal box? Thank you. – emidesigns Dec 30 '20 at 20:35
  • Yes. All grounds must be connected to each other including the metal box. One ground wire will be attached to the metal box. The rest of the grounds will be connected to the other end of this wire. Please give my answer a thumbs up so I can get credit for helping you. – PennyPincherWannaBeHandyMan Dec 31 '20 at 23:44

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