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I'm attaching a TV wall mount which is shown in the image to external studs that I will install in front of the wall.

Does it matter for the holding strength which holes on the TV mount I use, those at the ends or those closer to the center?

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    What are "external studs"? Are you adding additional lumber on the room side of the drywall so you can mount the bracket to those? If so, what are you attaching these "external studs" to in order to ensure they don't fall off the wall? – FreeMan Dec 17 '20 at 18:04
  • I added a photo in my original message showing the structure so far. – Ross Smalls Dec 17 '20 at 18:21
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    What is keeping this thing from tipping over sideways? Why not mount it on the wall? – Alaska Man Dec 17 '20 at 18:51
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    @AlaskaMan that was my immediate first reaction, too. However, upon careful inspection, it looks like there may be a bolt at the top corner of the horizontal piece that holds this to the wall up there. If that's the case, and there is a matching bolt at the other corner, that might be sufficient. – FreeMan Dec 17 '20 at 18:53
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    @FreeMan - I saw that but was not sure as i can not see a head for that fastener, and it prompted my second question, if the wall can be screwed into then why the makeshift stand? – Alaska Man Dec 17 '20 at 18:55
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Based on the picture you provided, I would suggest that, if possible, you should use holes that will allow your lag bolts to go through the horizontal band of wood and the vertical post portion, as well. This will give your bolts the maximum about of solid wood to grip into.

It's hard to tell from that image, but I would suspect that you used 1 by material for the horizontal and 2 by material for the vertical. That would give you a maximum of 2-1/4" of wood for your lags to hold in, where the mount is expecting to be attached to the narrow edge of a 2 x 4 stud, thus allow for 3-1/2" of wood. Since you'll be using shorter lags, you might want to consider adding an extra couple, just to distribute the weight a little more.

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    This, or use short lags for the pre-drilled holes on the mounting bracket, and make a couple of holes in the center for some longer screws that go through both the horizontal and vertical boards. – PhilippNagel Dec 17 '20 at 19:54
  • added another photo with the TV wall mount template taped on the stand and a screw for the TV mount with two pieces of the wood thickness I'm using. I used two pieces of wood 2x4 for the leg on the floor and lower portion of the board on top and 2x9 for the vertical pole and top portion of the board. The holes on the TV wall mount are spaced wider than the 9" pole so will added 2 pieces of wood shown on the last picture at the back of the board to add for the length of the screws but they will not be attached to the main vertical pole, just at the back of the board for the TV wall mount. – Ross Smalls Dec 17 '20 at 19:59
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    To be honest, as wide as the mount is in relation to the pole, I'd consider putting a 2x4 on the back of the pole at the top & the bottom, sandwich short layers of 2x4 between the front an bottom, giving you a total of 6" (nominal) depth then use longer lags to attach the mount to ensure you're going into the back 2x4. That will help put the load on the full width of the 2x4 that's going behind the pole, using the strength in that full width 2x4 behind the pole, not just the screws holding the back to the front. – FreeMan Dec 17 '20 at 22:36
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    Others may disagree and say what you're planning is fine, and, frankly, it probably is. I'd hate to say it would be OK, then have your TV come crashing down and you'd feel I was responsible. The amount of overkill you build in is totally up to you. For example, I'd also angle those top "L" anchors upright, and put an eye bolt into the back of the stand so that you've got a full on hook in case something fails, those will help catch it instead of just sliding by. But, I'm an over-engineer - just ask my wife... – FreeMan Dec 17 '20 at 22:39
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    @RossSmalls make sure you show your appreciation by clicking the up vote arrow for all the answers that help you, and the check-mark next to the one that helped you the most. – FreeMan Dec 18 '20 at 11:39
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Most likely it does not matter, which is why they give you multiple holes, so you have some wiggle room with centering on a wall etc.

But the only way to know for sure is to look at the instruction for your specific TV mount.

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  • The TV wall mount template is the actual template from my mount. The TV wall mount manual says the different holes are provided for walls with different stud spacing. This link is to the pdf manual avfimg.com/i/instructions/469267_rev01.pdf – Ross Smalls Dec 17 '20 at 18:26
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    So it sounds like any of the holes can be used with no issues then. Looking at your picture, how are you going to make sure your setup won't tip to the side? Is the reason for doing it this way because you're not allowed to make holes in the wall? – PhilippNagel Dec 17 '20 at 18:33
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    @RossSmalls that "very thin metal framing" is steel studs. Believe it or not, those are, structurally, the equivalent of a 2x4 wood stud. It takes using the proper fasteners to hang things from them (as opposed to standard wood screws/lag bolts used with a wooden 2x4), but they're equally as strong and equally as capable of supporting extra weight. I understand why you made this contraption, not understanding that, but you've gone a bit overboard... – FreeMan Dec 17 '20 at 18:56
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    @RossSmalls They're lying. In their defense, though, they probably know that most people won't use the proper anchors for attaching things to steel studs, therefore a 75lb TV/mount combo will come crashing down. This blanket statement covers them and keeps you from breaking your $1000 TV and starting an argument about it. Keeps everyone safer that way. – FreeMan Dec 17 '20 at 19:34
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    @FreeMan hmm. There are steel studs that are designed for bearing loads, and steel studs that are thinner sheet metal and can only be used for interior, non load bearing walls. You’re completely right about using the right anchors, as sheet metal screws will pull right through the thin metal when you put a load on them, where expanding toggles will brace against the back side of the sheet metal and not pull through. Still, I wouldn’t hang cabinets on the thinner interior metal studs without building bracing into them. – Craig Dec 17 '20 at 22:19

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