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I have a canon cooking range. When I push the igniter button, its body gives an electric shock. What can be the reasons and how can I minimize the risks of getting those shocks?

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  • Could be there is some moisture conducting. Try dying it well – Eugene Sh. Dec 4 '20 at 20:28
  • Per site rules, "Questions on the use of electronic devices are off-topic as this site is intended specifically for questions on electronics design." and "Questions on the repair of consumer electronics, appliances, or other devices must involve specific troubleshooting steps and demonstrate a good understanding of the underlying design of the device being repaired." – Chris Stratton Dec 4 '20 at 20:46
  • Q1 - VITAL - Does the igniter ignite the gas? || IF the shock is from the igniter piezo unit and IF the igniter works then it sounds as if the igniter IS grounded (at least locally) to the stove main metal work BUT that the stove top proper is not. Use an ohm meter (a DMM feature) to check DC resistance from bare metal on stove top to stove main body metalwork. This should be a few Ohms at worst and probably under 1 Ohm. IF the top is not properly grounded make it so. – Russell McMahon Dec 6 '20 at 8:08
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I assume that the igniter is igniting the gas.

IF the shock is caused by the igniter piezo unit and
IF the igniter works
THEN it sounds as if the igniter IS grounded (at least locally) to the stove main metal work
BUT that the stove top proper is not.

Use an ohm meter (a DMM feature) to check DC resistance from bare metal on stove top to stove main body metalwork.
This should be a few Ohms at worst and probably under 1 Ohm.

IF the top is not properly grounded make it so.

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Welcome to Electrical Engineering Stack Exchange. Depending upon your experience level, you may wish to have an electrician look at your situation. If you have sufficient experience, here are some things to check.

  1. Check to see whether the outlet supplying the power to your stove is properly wired. Occasionally, line and neutral wires are accidentally reversed. That needs to be corrected.

  2. Check to see that your stove is properly grounded to your wall socket, and that the wall socket ground is grounded to earth.

  3. Check to see that the neutral wire is no more than a volt or two above ground. Check it both when there are no other appliances running on that circuit, and when there are heavy loads, such as a microwave or space heater running.

  4. You should, in any case, check to see if you have ground fault circuit breakers. They are called something else outside of the US I believe. If you do not have ground fault circuit breakers, they are a good investment and could possibly save someone's life or prevent a fire.

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    I think OP is getting a shock from the piezo element which sparks and ignites the gas, not from a mains wiring issue. – Adam Lawrence Dec 4 '20 at 20:46
  • @AdamLawrence I would think that one end of the igniter should be grounded. Unless he his touching the "hot" end of the ignitor, if the other end is grounded, he shouldn't be getting a shock. No? Leads me to wonder whether stove is in fact properly grounded. – Math Keeps Me Busy Dec 4 '20 at 20:51
  • I am getting shock on the front body. Infact if i bring a tester near body anywhere on stove, it starts blinking as igniter clicks. – booota Dec 4 '20 at 20:57
  • @boota is this in the United States? Did you just purchase the stove? Has this problem always been present, or is it new? – Math Keeps Me Busy Dec 4 '20 at 21:02
  • No, it's not new and not in USA. I just replaced the lighter tips and before that the igniter wasn't in use since long. So don't have clue if the problem was already there or not. – booota Dec 4 '20 at 21:13

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