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I am putting in a dishwasher and I have a dedicated 20A circuit (12/2, 20A breaker).

I have 15A outlet handy.

Is it okay to install it in this application?

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You can use a 15A duplex, but not a single outlet. [NEC 210.21(B)(1) and (3)].

Edit: Sorry my answer was initially incomplete, only answering specifically what was asked. Many additional Code requirements still apply. GFCI protection (breaker, device, or receptacle) is likely required, see code references in comments to other answer.

Your added picture shows you mounted receptacle with only center screw, 406.5(C) requires receptacles mounted on covers to be mounted by more than one screw.

Also worth mentioning since the ground screw hole was empty in the first picture that the equipment ground needs to be pigtailed to the box and receptacle so both remain grounded when the cover is removed.

It does look like you are probably satisfying the 422.16(B)(2)(6) requirement that the receptacle for the DW must be in the cabinet adjacent to the DW.

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    That is a duplex, two receptacles. – NoSparksPlease Dec 5 '20 at 20:54
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    @NoSparksPlease No, a single duplex counts as one receptacle. Maybe I misunderstand this. – tnknepp Dec 5 '20 at 20:56
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    @tnknepp -- nope, a duplex receptacle is two receptacles on one yoke -- 210.21(B)(3) says "two or more receptacles or outlets" – ThreePhaseEel Dec 5 '20 at 20:57
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    @tnknepp Not the interpretation in states I've worked, See Article 100 definition of receptacle, last sentence, – NoSparksPlease Dec 5 '20 at 21:01
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    Thanks, folks. I rated as answer. – David Dec 5 '20 at 21:13
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A 15A duplex receptacle, as noted an another answer, is 100% fine. However, there may be a GFCI requirement, depending on your local code. If GFCI is required and your breaker has GFCI, you are all set. If GFCI is required and your breaker does not have GFCI then you will need to replace the breaker or install a GFCI receptacle (duplex 15A, duplex 20A or single 20A) here.

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  • It's probably a situation where the receptacle attaches to a faceplate or mudring – ThreePhaseEel Dec 6 '20 at 0:41
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    @ThreePhaseEel Good point. I updated the photos to show the faceplate. The left outlet(s) if for a garbage disposal and the right is for dishwasher. According to my research, neither needs a GFCI. Before this, they were simply directly attached via an exposed 14/2 and 12/2. Neither were GFCI-ed. – David Dec 6 '20 at 7:12
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    @David Any work you do has to comply with NEC adopted at the time you are doing work. Don't know what edition is locally adopted, 2014/2017 NEC 210.8(D) requires GFCI protection for receptacle and hardwired dishwasher connections, and 2020 was moved to 422.5, but relaxes the requirement by allowing non-gfci circuits if protection is provided by the appliance. However the receptacles for DW and disposer may fall still under the within 6' from sink, but some jurisdictions (strangely) don't extend requirement through cabinet doors. – NoSparksPlease Dec 6 '20 at 15:24

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