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wire stripper close-up

I have been using this wire stripper for a while, but I have always wondered what was the purpose of those holes in the center and above LOOP, and those teeth on the handles.

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301

wire stripper detailing specific features

PLIERS

Used as pliers.

Stripper

80 - 22/20

Strip 22-20 AWG (.8 mm) wire.

1.0 - 18

Strip 18 AWG (1.0 mm) wire.

1.3 - 16

Strip 16 AWG (1.3 mm) wire.

1.6 - 14

Strip 14 AWG (1.6 mm) wire.

2.0 - 12

Strip 12 AWG (2.0 mm) wire.

1.6 - 10

Strip 10 AWG (2.6 mm) wire.

CUT

Used to cut wires and cables.

LOOP

The loop hole is used to bend hooks in wires, so that the wire can be attached to screw terminals. Place the tip of a stripped wire into the hole, and bend the wire around the body of the tool.

Screw/Bolt Shearing Holes

The other holes in the middle of the body, are screw/bolt shearing holes. They are used to cut small screws/bolts to length. To use them, simply thread the screw/bolt into the proper sized hole to the desired length, then squeeze the handles together. The screw/bolt will be trimmed, without damaging the threads.

CRIMP

INSULATED AND NON-INSULATED

This means that you can crimp insulated and non-insulated crimp terminals

16 - 10

This means the tool can crimp insulated and non-insulated 16-10 gauge crimp terminals. The colors below represent the color of the insulated crimp terminals, for quick reference.

  • Blue = 16-14 Gauge
  • Yellow = 12-10 Gauge

22-18

This means the tool can crimp insulated and non-insulated 22-18 gauge crimp terminals. The colors below represent the color of the insulated crimp terminals, for quick reference.

  • Red = 22-18 Gauge

INSULATION ONLY 7 - 8MM AUTO

This means the tool can crimp insulated 7-8mm auto ignition wires (spark plug wires).

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  • 3
    It's kind of funny that it actually says exactly what everything is for right on the tool.
    – Jason C
    Feb 12 '16 at 20:44
  • Yeah. I'll bet all those things were explained on the packaging too.
    – AndyW
    Jun 26 '16 at 1:59
  • 2
    Crimper part also known as... "OUCH... I have to remember to keep my finger out of there when I am stripping wires....."
    – Trevor_G
    Mar 3 '17 at 21:28
  • 1
    @Trevor_G there exists a type of rotary stripper that drags a blade around the outside of the insulation.. They have a "finger loop" at the end for convenience and speed and are used for lots of the same wire, so ethernet installers. They also have sharp cutter blades in the handle for making all the wires the same length. Once I got my finger in the wrong spot and rotary-cut around the whole finger. It was unpleasant and messy.
    – Criggie
    Jul 28 at 19:35
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wire loop holes near outside jaw edge

wire loop hole being used to bend a loop in wire

The holes in the center around the pivot are bolt cutters for metric bolts, the loop hole is to help you make loops in wire.

(images source: toolguyd.com

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    Thanks, this image helped me a lot. When I read the description from another answer here, I thought about putting all of the bare copper through the whole then trying to bend it, and thought "man that will hurt my fingers". But this is much easier! Thanks!
    – dpollitt
    Aug 22 '14 at 1:32

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