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I moved into a new home in the summer and having water issues with water at the corner of my garage. The picture probably helps the most, but basically after everything has dried up, I still have water dripping from the corner. It looks like the water is coming in behind the eaves and along the facia, then gets to the soffit and finds the lowest point where it drips to the ground. It looks like the shingles are on well and drip correctly into the eaves. Also think there is a drip edge the whole way along. Any tips what might be causing this?

I'm worried this will be a bigger issue in the winter with freeze thaw and an ice patch right on the pathway.

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Here is a picture from above.

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  • It looks like the gutter is just holding water which will find a seam to leak through.. For that, and other reasons I just removed gutters. Dec 3 '20 at 16:23
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    @blacksmith37 you're right about the leak and maybe standing water, but removing gutters isn't a good suggestion. They were installed for a reason--usually either personal comfort or groundwater handling for the foundation.
    – isherwood
    Dec 3 '20 at 16:51
  • Side note - You may want to have someone inspect your roof, the shingles in the second photo don't look good. Dec 3 '20 at 22:49
  • Also of note: Based on those shingles below the window, It's time to get your roof replaced, but I'm sure you were already aware of that. That's never a fun check to write... :(
    – FreeMan
    Dec 4 '20 at 14:52
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Looks like you've got water standing in the gutter. It also looks like you've got a mitered corner on the gutter itself.

Standing water:

Either the gutter is not sloped correctly, or the downspout is clogged.

  • To check slope, pull off some of those plastic clips and put a long level on the edge of the gutter. If the gutter is dead level, that's your problem - it should slope about 1/4" per foot. If the bubble is off center, that's good. Center the bubble and measure the gap between the level and the top of the gutter - it should be about 1/4" of height for each foot of run.

  • If it's just debris in the gutter preventing water from flowing to the downspout, or debris in the downspout itself, that's all pretty easy to scoop out. Not fun, necessarily, but an easy fix.

Corner miter:

That miter may not be well sealed. Or, the seal may have failed. Because there's water standing in the gutter, it's slowly dripping through and down the soffit.

You'll have to get the water out of the gutter, then dig into that corner to see what's going on there. You want a good seal between the two pieces of gutter along each wall to ensure the water moves along the gutter to the downspout instead of leaking out at the seam. You may need to clean out the seal the best you can, then squeeze some sealant into the gap.

What's my line?

Additionally, this line at the back of the gutter trough itself just caught my attention. Most gettering I've seen does not have any sort of a bend, break, or other anomaly along the back wall. It might be worth taking a look at this to see what's going on here. If it's a seam of any sort, make sure it's good and tight and sealed.

enter image description here

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  • I'm with FreeMan on going after the corner joint between the two gutters. That seems to be the weak link. They make some good gutter-specific sealants that are mean to flow/seep into minute cracks before it sets up.
    – SteveSh
    Dec 3 '20 at 18:43
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I don't see a drip edge installed.

That would stop the water from migrating uphill on the shingles. Maybe it isn't installed properly: It should not be up against the fascia and should overhang onto the utters.

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  • There's drip edge there. You can see the vertical flange in the photos.
    – isherwood
    Dec 3 '20 at 16:45

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