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When wiring new construction or remodel for lets say a bathroom or kitchen, it is determined you need GFCI receptacles in wet prone areas. But do you need a GFCI breaker plus GFCI outlets on the same circuit? Wouldn't it be ideal to have AFCI breaker with GFCI receptacles to have both forms of protection?

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One or the other, not both. Depending on adopted code, you may ALSO need AFCI protection, which is better done at the breaker.

GFCI is pretty much the same for practical purposes whether at the breaker or at the first device, except for special circumstances like a buried cable.

You do NOT need multiple GFCIs on one circuit - just make a GFCI the FIRST device and then wire the rest of the devices from its LOAD terminals which will protect the rest of the devices on the circuit. Carefully follow instructions for wiring line and load on the GFCI and place GFCI protected labels on the remaining outlets/devices.

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For new circuits or remodel, put AFCI protection at the breaker or none at all. The only exception is if the run from panel to first receptacle is in metal conduit or 2" of concrete. AFCI protects wiring in the walls.

For GFCI the protection can be anywhere along the line between the breaker and the first recep that needs protection, as long as the LOAD terminals are used to protect the rest of the circuit.

If you want to fit GFCI receptacles plural on one circuit, then do not use the LOAD terminals at all. Leave them covered up by the warning tape. This may seem to waste GFCI devices, but some people find it desirable so the GFCI reset is right there; and also it allows you to select which downline receps are GFCI and which are not, so you can omit GFCI where it does more harm than good, i.e. refrigerators, fire alarm panels, radon systems etc.

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No it wouldn't be better to have AFCI with GFCI. If the circuit needs to be gfi protected then using the gfci breaker you do not have to have gfci receptacle too. Gfci receptacles are more expensive than standard receptacles so if the circuit is already on gfci breaker just use standard receptacles. The code now requires any circuit not gfi protected be on an arc fault breaker in residential applications so depending on how recently the house was wired it could have protected panel installed and regular devices can be used. Arc fault breakers are not only for wires in a wall. Anything that causes an arc will trip the breaker so if you plug anything with a motor into like a vacuum cleaner or if someone were to cut the wires on a live circuit it would trip and not blow your pliers out. If you cut all three wires at the same time on live circuit that's AFCI protected you probably wouldn't notice that it was hot. If you do that on circuit that's not protected you will know and most likely turn your pliers into strippers as well.

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    Current code requirements include both GFCI and AFCI protection for many of the usual GFCI suspects (kitchen and laundry as of 2017) Nov 3 '20 at 5:18
  • Hold on! A lot of misinformation/confusion here. GFCI breakers are typically more expensive than GFCI receptacles. Not "any circuit not gfi protected be on an arc fault breaker" - there are still some exceptions. Cut all wires AFCI protected might catch it as an arc fault, but I wouldn't bet me life on it. etc. Nov 3 '20 at 5:25
  • I never said gfci breakers were less expensive than gfci receptacles. I said that gfci receptacles are more expensive than standard receptacles so if already on gfci breaker use a regular receptacle. The question also was asking if needed both breaker and receptacle needed to be gfci so obviously it was a plug circuit and not the stove or water heater or anything that would be the exception. Im sure it would pick it up as an arc when cutting all the wires at the same time and have seen it happen on several occasions. Part of the reason they were required is children sticking things in rec.
    – Jo2ker
    Nov 3 '20 at 5:45
  • never said gfci breakers were less expensive than gfci receptacles. I said that gfci receptacles are more expensive than standard receptacles so if already on gfci breaker use a regular receptacle. The question also was asking if needed both breaker and receptacle needed to be gfci so obviously it was a plug circuit and not the stove or water heater or anything that would be the exception. Im sure it would pick it up as an arc when cutting all the wires at the same time and have seen it happen Part of the reason they were required is children sticking things in rec. – Jo2ker 31 mins ago
    – Jo2ker
    Nov 3 '20 at 6:18

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