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I am planning to make my own DIY whiteboard, so I was thinking about the type of plastic I will use. I found out that PMMA and PC is way too expensive for my first DIY whiteboard, so I am considering trying ou it with PP, PVC, PS or PETG first. Which of these would you choose? Will it be dry erasable? Thanks very much.

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  • Why do you want to "diy" it instead of ordering a piece of porcelain (high quality) or melamine (low quality) and going from there? Oct 31 '20 at 13:39
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    If your town/city/area has a location where home appliances are dropped off for recycling, you might be able to get a nice hunk of porcelain-enamelled steel from an old white appliance casing.
    – Ecnerwal
    Oct 31 '20 at 14:13
  • Clear acrylic enamel (aka spray paint) will form a water-tight seal on almost any surface it can coat. I expo on the side of my computer case all the time, and it wipes off. Sometimes it needs windex or IPA after a long time, but that's true of most "real" surfaces as well.
    – dandavis
    Oct 31 '20 at 20:02
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I have gone through many different versions of whiteboards; purchased and DIY. Quickly, they all become terrible and the ink is difficult to erase. I tried car wax to condition the plastic as well with little results. I ended up stumbling upon a fantastic solution: I cam across some pieces of glass with rounded edges that were used for a shelving project. There were about 2'x3' each. Mounting these on the walls in our office was easy using some stylish brushed nickel mirror hangers. They work amazing and I highly recommend seeking out glass as an alternative.

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  • FYI: High quality whiteboards are made using porcelain. Oct 31 '20 at 13:40
  • Yes, and many modern offices are using glass "whiteboards" they are in general more expensive but reliable to clean.
    – DaveM
    Oct 31 '20 at 17:14
  • @whatsisname: perhaps, but you can't dry-erase porcelain; it's porous; like th back of a tile for example. What you're writing on is a ceramic glaze, which is basically a thin glass coating on the ceramic's surface.
    – dandavis
    Oct 31 '20 at 20:00

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