2

Currently my washer is on one wall next to a standing drainpipe and blocks access to an exterior door. I would like to move the washer to the exterior wall, next to the dryer, but that would require running the drain hose from one side of the room to the other.

I would like to run the hose almost completely straight up so it clears the door (the door is 7ft tall), then to turn and slowly slope down over the door, turn again (the distance between the washer and the corner of the wall is roughly 4ft), and then continue to run on a slope down the other wall (this distance is roughly 5ft) into the standing drainpipe.

I've read in a few places the water can still pump correctly as long as the hose isn't higher than 8ft, however, every video I've seen the drain is also that high and the hose doesn't then go back down. Also, would it be best to use a hose for the full length or can I use PVC pipe?

Any tips or advice would be greatly appreciated!

Drawing showing proposed hose idea

  • 1
    I worry that the force of the water running down hill from that height will push through the trap with such velocity that it will clear the trap of water, I.E. not leave enough water in the trap to keep out sewer gases. – Alaska Man Oct 28 at 19:17
  • Thank you @AlaskaMan! Thats a great point I hadn't thought of! It might be worth getting a plumber out to look at this incase theres more things I'm missing. – Lia Oct 28 at 22:37
  • How high can your washer lift water? What make and model is it, even? – ThreePhaseEel Oct 29 at 0:33
  • You could install a stand pipe on the washer side the door with a trap, ( if there is room from the ceiling to door for the top of stand pipe to trap distance specified by code, if not then on other side of door near top of door,) and run PVC to the drain. If your washer is a front loader you can buy or build a pedestal stand to raise your washer so the lift distance is not so far. – Alaska Man Oct 30 at 19:26
2

This may work depending on your washing machine. You can test it by holding the hose up high (get a longer one if needed) and see if the machine drains correctly.

In my neighborhood, it's common for washing machines to pump water from basements up to the street level. The reason is our sewer service lines are shallow. Many homes just let that laundry water go out to the storm drains (the city allows it) so their washing machines are pumping the water up around 7 or 8 feet. In my house, we use the sewer for laundry, but the way it's plumbed, the drain is nearly that high. It works fine.

| improve this answer | |
  • I'm shocked (but I don't doubt) that in 2020 we still have places in the US where you can drain a washing machine to the storm drains. – Steve Sether Oct 28 at 18:52
  • At my previous house, our kitchen drained directly to the adjacent river. This is an upgrade! – Jeff Wheeler Oct 28 at 20:42
  • 1
    Wow, I agree with Steve, thats wild it just goes into the storm drains! Thank you so much for the insight @JeffWheeler, it sounds like my only possible issue going forward will be sewer gas leaking out due to the velocity as another commenter mentioned. – Lia Oct 28 at 22:42
-2

No, this will not work. The drain system in a washer is designed to work with a pipe that is about 4' above the floor. This is why they come with a drain hose that will only fit in a drain about that height off the floor.

If you try to make it drain higher up, which is what you are doing, the pump will not be able to push the water that far or, if it is able to, it will be overloaded since it wasn't designed for that purpose.

Let me suggest two options:

  1. Move the washer to the area near the pipe.
  2. Move the drain pipe to the new location near the washer.

Failing that, the only solution I can think of would be a drain tank next to the washer with a pump that has the capability of draining as you have drawn. But that solution seems like it could be a recipe for disaster over time.

The only exception to this would be if the specification for your particular model of washer says that a lift of 7' is acceptable. But this is going to be the exception not the rule.

EDIT:

You noted in the comments that the manual for the washer says 96". So yes, your plan will work. I'd use PVC pipe but a hose should work as well.

| improve this answer | |
  • > This is why they come with a drain hose that will only fit in a drain about that height off the floor. Gotcha, I figured that was just the standard, since they do sell drain hose extensions. > The only exception to this would be if the specification for your particular model of washer says that a lift of 7' is acceptable. But this is going to be the exception not the rule. The manual says up to 96", but from what I saw it meant the drain that high, not the hose going that high and then back down. – Lia Oct 28 at 17:14
  • If the specs in the manual say 96" that will work. The UP part is the problem, water comes down on its own. – jwh20 Oct 28 at 18:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.