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I need extra outlets in my kitchen and in order to install a bigger junction box, I need to cut the glass tile that's already installed. Is it feasible and, if so, what's the most effective tool to use?

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  • There are a lot of YouTube videos discussing this. – Steve Wellens Oct 27 '20 at 14:15
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I would probably start with an oscillating tool equipped with a diamond-tipped blade. That will allow you to make plunge cuts through the glass tile pretty easily:

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  • For some values of "pretty easily"... This is exactly my thought, too, it will take care to make the initial cut, especially if OP has to start in the middle of a tile surface, not in a grout joint. – FreeMan Oct 27 '20 at 11:30
  • Agree - although a curved blade would be easier to work down the line, otherwise you'll be starting off the cut on a slippery tile every time – SiHa Oct 27 '20 at 11:32
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It can be done with a Dremel rotary tool if you need to get into really tight spaces. (I prefer the wheel-style Dremel tip for this, but they also have drill-style glass cutting bits too.)
Dremel EZ545 blade

I agree with the above posts that a diamond-tipped blade is preferred. Dremel EZ545 shown (but many other options available)

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  • This should work reasonably well for cutting the tiles, then switch to a jig saw with a standard wood cutting blade and/or a simple drywall/key hole saw for cutting through the backer board. – FreeMan Oct 27 '20 at 15:23
  • I've used this exact blade for cutting quartz and it worked very well. Glass is way softer material than quartz so it'll go through it without issue and with the dremel you can control the speed as well which will allow you to control the rate at which it cuts. – Micah Montoya Oct 27 '20 at 15:29
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Diamond tooling, without a doubt.

My personal preference runs to a dry-cut diamond blade on a small grinder (with a vacuum cleaner held in close proximity on the side dust spews out of) which I would describe as "quick, but can be messy." With a good vacuum carefully held, not TOO messy.

Given that you are cutting for junction boxes, you can overlap the cuts at the corner since the excess cut (if not excessive) will be hidden under the outlet cover plate. For other purposes or if you don't want those little bits cut, you can stop at the corner and finish with some other diamond cutting tool.

In theory (and perhaps in practice, just not my practice) you can also use an appropriate bit on a "cutout tool" (lightweight router mostly intended for drywall cutouts.)

To some extent your choice may depend on what tools you already own that you can get a diamond blade for or what tool you find most reasonable to purchase for the job, considering your other uses for the tool.

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  • Do they make diamond flush-cutting router bits? Of course they do, I've just never seen one or thought about it. – FreeMan Oct 27 '20 at 15:24

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