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enter image description hereenter image description hereenter image description hereI am replacing an old balcony with these custom designed supports. When I drilled in with 1/2 masonry sleeves it would not grab. Looking at the brick, its hollow. Is there any way to safely secure these brackets without having to put supports on other side of the wall? The top header of the deck meets the floor header of house so I plan on bolting right to it, which will help, but the supports only go into the hollow brick. See pics. enter image description here. I have more pics, but cant find a way to upload more than one here.

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  • Who designed the supports? – whatsisname Oct 17 '20 at 2:07
  • You didn't provide any dimensions, so its hard to even make a guess at what the pull out load is on the top fasteners. But figuring on a couple of adults & kids (500-600 lbs) standing near the edge, it's going to be significant. I agree with those who have said this is a disaster waiting to happen if you try to fasten to the holly brick facade. – SteveSh Oct 17 '20 at 11:54
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I would never hang a deck off a brick veneer or any finish, you have to attach to something structural. The pullout force generated by the cantilever is going to be tremendous. When it fails, it won't be a minor mishap.

Honestly I wouldn't go anywhere near this without putting a lot more thought into it, getting an engineer or architect's stamp on the plan, and getting it inspected.

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    I totally agree. This would be an accident waiting to happen. +1 – JACK Oct 16 '20 at 22:52
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Those brackets aren't going to work on a hollow brick wall.

What you do is rip up the floor inside those doors and fit pressure treated cantilever floor beams that support the interior floor and are securely attached to the building frame at the far end and where they pass through the wall.

if you don't want to rip up the floor maybe you can rip up the ceiling below instead.

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I own a home with an upper balcony with cantilever floor joists that extend out to support the balcony.

These are TROUBLE with a capital T. DO NOT go this route. With mine one of the beam ends is already rotting so my only option is basically to cut the beam off the side of the building and hope that the wood rot hasn't extended into the interior of the house.

Get rid of those custom designed supports and replace the 4 posts that clearly were there before (as you can see the darkening on the side of the building showing there used to be posts there) and quit second guessing the architect. I've seen some pretty dumb fails in post-construction home modifications, haven't people ever played with Lincoln Logs as kids???

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The brick is no so much a problem as the mortar , it has very little tensile strength. Any significant force ,other than compression, will pull it apart.

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