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I am using luminous solar nxg 1100 solar inverter. At my home, I have 4 fans, one tv, 10 led lights, 3 laptops and a desktop. All the equipments work fine when there is main supply. If there is no main power, everything works fine if I do not connect the destop . But as soon as I connect my desktop ,all led light starts flickering.First I thought, it may be the overload problem of the inverter. But later I see if I switch off all the lights,disconnect all laptops & Tv, after that if I connect only an LED of 12 watt and the cpu, the led starts flickering. The flickering only starts when desktop is powered by inverter.

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    I’m voting to close this question because it's not about Home Improvement
    – Ack
    Oct 16 '20 at 18:29
  • Sounds like the power supply is rubbish. Oct 16 '20 at 20:23
  • Yeah, are we talking about a desktop or a laptop PC here? Also, where on this planet are you? Oct 16 '20 at 23:46
  • Do you have a pure sine wave innverter or modified? Some computer power supplies don't play well with modified (stepped) inverters and you might be seeing the side effects on your LEDs, which are very sensitive to voltage variations. Oct 17 '20 at 14:51
  • It is a pure sine wave inveter. I think the problem in in my Desktop. My configuration is here- (1) Inverter 700VA. When I connect multimeter to measure the current , it can supply 2.3 A current at 240 volt. (2) PC configuration - Antech 550 watt power supply, but at full load the PC draws 1.3A current at 240 volt. (3) intel I7 10700k processor (4) 32 GB corsair ram (5) 2 TB SATA HDD (6) 240 GB samsung SSD (7) Coolmaster 120 Liquid cooler (8) Benq 22" Monitor. I am quite surprise that inverter can handle upto 2.3A current at 240 volt without any flickering effect if I don't connect the PC. Oct 19 '20 at 14:28
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PCs, especially cheap PCs, have pretty big power supplies. The "850 watt" power supply actually draws over 1200 watts. It sounds like your PC is simply too much for the system. It may be necessary to downsize the PC, maybe get rid of performance video cards, get a smaller power supply, etc. One of the "micro-PCs or a Mac Mini would be a great choice.

You can also look at a DC power supply for the PC, so it draws directly off your battery instead of needing to go through the inverter.

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    Harp: I agree with most everything you say here, but must disagree here. PC power supplies are basically transformers and while a particular transformer might have a capacity of 1,200 watts, it will only draw enough power to supply the attached peripherals. Just like a 3 HP table saw might draw 10-11 amps (240V) at full load, it won't draw nearly that much when turned on and not cutting or cutting an easy cut. Still, very glad for all your contributions, I learn a lot here. Oct 17 '20 at 15:17
  • @George what I mean is that PCs with large power supplies are built with very little thought toward overall power consumption. Gaming PCs are very hungry, with hundreds of watts just for the video card and 1000W overall. We don’t know much about this PC, it could be a 5 year old used gaming PC. Oct 17 '20 at 17:32
  • Harp: You made me curious now! I have a Kill-a-watt monitor I'll have to find and see what my desktop PC draws. I'll let you know. Oct 17 '20 at 18:26
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PCs, especially cheap PCs, have pretty big power supplies. The "850 watt" power supply actually draws over 1200 watts. It sounds like your PC is simply too much for the system. It may be necessary to downsize the PC, maybe get rid of performance video cards, get a smaller power supply, etc. One of the "micro-PCs or a Mac Mini would be a great choice.

Hi, there's a misconception there my friend. If a PC is consuming 1200 Watts, that's a damaged one and Id rather get rid of it. You can have a PSU of 1000W and that just means its capacity. The current being pulled from a PC when idling nowadays is about 30-40Watts total. If you're a gamer is another story. GPU and CPU demands are much higher, but even do you shouldn't go more that 300Watts total at 100% utilization, unless you have a super high-end or extreme setup with dual GPU's, etc those tend to consume a lot. But hey, try to get a Kill-A-WATT monitor or UPS Maybe, UPS these days has a Wattage Builtin Monitor on their displays, I think that's the best and cheap option to see what's going with your PC Power, Cheap PSU units have horrible efficiency and poor Surge handling. I know this post is old, but I think can be helpful to future readers.

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