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In my crawl space I dug out the perimeter to about 3 inches below the footings. I then laid rock and installed perforated drain with sock to keep out debris and laid rock on top.

I dug a hole for the sump basin in the corner at the lowest point. Heavy rain came before job was completed and realized the majority of the water is coming in where the hole was dug for the basin. Started second-guessing if the basin should have been placed in that corner and that close to footer. How can I get water into basin?

There is no perforated drain in that corner. I was planning to attach drain pipe into each side of the basin leaving the side closest to the wall with no drainage pipe. How can I get the water from that corner into the basin? Thinking now that I should move the basin in about 2 foot and perforate the basin at the top so the water can drain into basin from that corner. Appreciate any thoughts any one has on this.

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  • It is not clear what your real issue is. The location where you want the basin is collecting water and is located at the lowest point in the crawl space. What is preventing the water from entering the basin. Some basin have holes holes in the sides and bottom to let the water into the basin. The basin can be surrounded by drain rocks. Where is your perimerter drain pipes connected to? – Programmer66 Oct 13 '20 at 19:35
  • The issue is most of the water is coming in at the corner where there is no perforated pipe. There is about an 18 inch area where there is no pipe only the basin. How can I get the water in that corner into the basin? Thanks! – user124414 Oct 14 '20 at 0:34
  • If the water is coming in through the corner where the sump basin is, won't it just run directly into the basin, thus not really needing any piping to get it there? Also, your keyboard comes with an <enter> key. It's used to provide paragraph breaks to separate sentences into blocks of related thoughts. Not using it leaves a "wall of text" which is very difficult to read. Please feel free to edit your post and use your <enter> key a few times. – FreeMan Oct 14 '20 at 12:38
  • @FreeMan, such basins are set with their top edge at floor (usually concrete slab) level. This would mean that water collects around the pail. – isherwood Oct 15 '20 at 12:54
  • In my area, which is at approx sea level, some houses with crawl space seem to have the crawl space pool with water. The sump pump basin tops are level or slightly below the level of the ground. None are set in concrete, just in a hole dug in the ground. Some have the perforated top with holes, or just no top at all. None have a seal basin that prevents water from entering, which would seem to be conterdictive to the purpose of the sump basin. – Programmer66 Oct 15 '20 at 14:37
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From you question and follow on Comment, it appears that the location of the sump pump is at the right location. It’s at the lowest point and after the heavy rain, the sump hole filled with water. From your descriptions, it appears that you believe the sump basin is sealed therefore not allowing water into the basin.
From your original question –

There is no perforated drain in that corner. I was planning to attach drain pipe into each side of the basin leaving the side closest to the wall with no drainage pipe. How can I get the water from that corner into the basin? Thinking now that I should move the basin in about 2 foot and perforate the basin at the top so the water can drain into basin from that corner.

If the location is the lowest point in that corner, there is no need to move it closer to the corner. Continue with connecting the drain pipes to each side of the basin. If your basin does not have holes in the bottom or in the sides, I would drill a few ½” holes in the sides and bottom and the top if you are using one. This will allow the ground water to weep into the basin. You can also wrap the side and bottom with screening to prevent dirt from entering the basin. I would using screen on the top also to prevent debris from entering the basin.
Dig the hole a little larger than the basin, and surround the bottom and sides with 3-4 “ of drain rocks.

Here’s a link to a YouTube Video showing a similar installation. I would use drain or crushed rocks on the sides of the basin as well.

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Programmer66 has some good suggestions. Some others:

  • Be sure the entire area around the sump basin, including where the perforated pipes connect, is immersed in washed rock (all the way to the footings in the corner). This essentially creates one large drainage area, and any water should find its way into the pipe without any further puncturing of the sump pail.
  • Consider adding a pipe stub out the pail into the corner. Wrap the end with fabric and surround it with washed rock. This would leave a shorter path and less water accumulation. If there's room you could tee this off the existing pipe, or cut a new hole at the same height as the others.
  • Think of the entire trenched area as a drainage basin and don't worry too much if the water has a circuitous path to the basin. As long as it has a path below floor level it shouldn't be a problem. If you have water flowing in so quickly that it doesn't drain you probably have issues that a sump pump can't reliably handle anyway.

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