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I had a bathroom sink added to opposite side of kitchen where there's a sink/dishwasher. I think contractor hired a plumber who is unlicensed. He insists the guy is licensed but I've had too many problems so far to believe that this guy is trained right.

First we had copper line leak that the plumber put in and now there's no pressure in kitchen sink. the contractor insists the guy didn't share the hot/cold water line but i am seeing it for myself and the plumber tapped into the cold/hot water on the kitchen wall - tapping into it with T-copper line to add a bathroom sink on the other side.

Is this why i have no pressure on my kitchen sink now? Is that even to code to add a sink in bathroom with same hot/cold water lines?

Note: photo shown is on new bathroom side where sink will go (other side of wall is current kitchen sink/dishwasher)

picture shown is on new bathroom side where sink will go (other side of wall is current kitchen sink/dishwasher)

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    can you provide a close up or better quality picture of the copper pipe joints? – Ack Oct 10 '20 at 23:46
  • License should be easy - might be as simple as look for their name on a website maintained by your state plumbing board or equivalent, these days. Otherwise, insist on seeing it, or perhaps call that plumbing board and inquire how you would check if a plumber is actually licensed in your area. If you have pressure loss and the other sink isn't even connected yet, there was some incompetent soldering or a valve was not opened fully after soldering. There's nothing in code against properly tapping into a line to supply another sink, though it can reduce pressure when both items are in use. – Ecnerwal Oct 11 '20 at 1:01
  • Unfortunately a license is no guarantee that a licensee is particularly good, but there may be some recourse... – Ecnerwal Oct 11 '20 at 1:03
  • Is the lack of pressure in the kitchen hot, cold, or both? If it's both, try removing and cleaning the aerator. – Aloysius Defenestrate Oct 11 '20 at 4:01
  • "the plumber tapped into the cold/hot water on the kitchen wall - tapping into it with T-copper line" - Do you mean, one tee for hot line and one for cold line? (there should be two tee's, one off each line). As noted, Putting a tee off of either line should not affect pressure unless both bathroom and kitchen fixtures are used at the same time. – Alaska Man Oct 11 '20 at 17:48
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You would loose pressure if both the bathroom and kitchen were in use at the same time, OTW that is not an issue.

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